Sonntag, 3. September 2017

Battenberg Socks with Ergonomically Shaped Toes

I'm still in the middle of sockmania - meaning that currently, I don't have many other knitting ideas, but as long as I'm knitting anything, I'm fine. This time I wanted to try out a different toe shape. I.e. a different sock for the left and the right foot. And to make it a bit more interesting, I included a little intarsia pattern as well.

The chart and the exact description is given for socks knitted with 60 stitches in the round (i.e. for sizes 36 to 39). But there will be instructions on how to change it for smaller and bigger sizes as well.

As to the name: The line-up of the rectangles reminded me a little of the pattern in a Battenberg cake.

Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on

Once again, this is NOT a complete knitting pattern, but a rough sketch how to knit these socks.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




Materials
  • about 50 to 60 grams of fingering weight yarn - about 50 grams of the main color (MC, light violet in the photos) and 10 grams of the contrast color (CC, white in the photos)
  • 2.5 mm knitting needles - I used long circulars with the magic loop method which is useful if you want to divide your stitches into two halves
  • a stitch marker to mark where the intarsia pattern starts
  • scrap yarn for the afterthought heel
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends
Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on


Techniques
  • Toe up sock knitting: as explained on dummies.com or in this video by Girly Knits. This includes starting with Judy's Magic Cast On, a technique that gives you live stitches on both sides of your needle - it is generally used for toe-up socks (e.g. in this pattern), but it can be used for other purposes as well. Here's a written description (from Knitty) and here's a YouTube-video by Cat Bordhi and another YouTube-video by Very Pink Knits.
  • Cutting a sock template of your feet: To make the finished piece fit your feet, it is useful to measure your feet and to cut out a card template. Here's a blogpost at knitbettersocks.blogspot.com that explains the idea.  If you want to knit a pair for someone else and cannot get a template, here are standard shoe size templates.  
  • Afterthought heel: Here's a tutorial in three videos by Knit Purl Hunter. Alternatively, you can do any kind of short row heel.
  • Intarsia in the round:  as shown in this YouTube video by Julia farwell-clay.
    I used the method from this video. Basically you knit back and forth even though your stitches are arranged in the round - and you have to consider rounds in pairs - one RS row and one WS row. You start with your main color (MC) on the RS, then - as in normal intarsia you change (by twisting the yarns) - to contrast color (CC) and knit your CC part, After finishing this you turn your work, make a yarn-over and do the WS with CC, when you get to the MC part you change back as in normal (flat) intarsia to MC.
    Now with MC you work your way on the WS not only to the start of the round, but further to the point where you ended the CC part. Here you p2tog the last MC stitch with the yarn over in CC. Then you turn - again with a yarn over - and do the RS part to the beginning of the round. That's the two round finished.
    When - during the next pair of rounds - you reach the new yarn over on the RS, you have to do an ssk of the last stitch in CC with the yarn over in MC.
Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on


Instructions

Toe
Do a magic CO of 10 sts - while knitting the first round, put a marker at the half and the end of the round.

Knit the to according to the chart below. The chart shows on half of one of each foot, the second half is the mirror of the first half. The numbers in the middle indicate the row number.

Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on
Toe increases - click to enlarge

If you knit according to this chart, you'll end up with 60 stitches (good for socks in sizes 36 to 39). For socks in smaller sizes (e.g. 32 to 35) you'll need to end up with 56 stitches. Here I'd suggest you start with a magic CO of 9 stitches and leave out one increase on the outer side (e.g. in row 14). That way you have 2 fewer stitches on each half which means a total of four fewer stitches.
Similarly, for socks in bigger sizes (e.g. 40 to 43), I'd suggest a magic CO of 11 stitches and one increase more on the outer side, e.g. in row 16. 


Foot

Once you've finished the toe, you can start with the intarsia pattern. It consists of rectangles that are 4 stitches wide and 4 stitches high - stacked in a Battenberg pattern.

Pattern for left foot

For the left sock, place a stitch marker to mark the start the intarsia pattern on the outer side 4 stitches away from the edge of the outer half on the front.

Rounds 1 and 2
- RS, MC: k to stitch marker, change to CC
- RS, CC: k 4 sts, turn work
- WS, CC: yo, p4, change to MC
- WS, MC: p to the beginning of the round, and - without turning, go on purling to 1 sts before the yo in CC, p2tog (i.e. you purl together the last stitch in MC and the yo in CC - connecting the two), turn work
- RS, MC: yo, k to beginning of round
Rounds 3 and 4 = Rounds 1 and 2

Rounds 5 and 6
- RS, MC: k to stitch marker, k4, change to CC
- RS, CC: k 4 sts, turn work
- WS, CC: yo, p4, change to MC
- WS, MC: p to the beginning of the round, and - without turning, go on purling to 1 sts before the yo in CC, p2tog (i.e. you purl together the last stitch in MC and the yo in CC - connecting the two), turn work
- RS, MC: yo, k to beginning of round
Rounds 7 and 8 = Rounds 5 and 6


Pattern for right foot

For the right sock. place the intarsia block mirrored to the first sock, and for that you need to place the stitch marker 12 stitches away from the outer edge of the front of the sock (i.e. 4 sts away from edge plus 8 stitch width or intarsia pattern. The pattern is also mirrored to the other sock.

Rounds 1 and 2
- RS, MC: k to stitch marker, k4, change to CC
- RS, CC: k 4 sts, turn work
- WS, CC: yo, p4, change to MC
- WS, MC: p to the beginning of the round, and - without turning, go on purling to 1 sts before the yo in CC, p2tog (i.e. you purl together the last stitch in MC and the yo in CC - connecting the two), turn work
- RS, MC: yo, k to beginning of round
Rounds 3 and 4 = Rounds 1 and 2

Rounds 5 and 6
- RS, MC: k to stitch marker, change to CC
- RS, CC: k 4 sts, turn work
- WS, CC: yo, p4, change to MC
- WS, MC: p to the beginning of the round, and - without turning, go on purling to 1 sts before the yo in CC, p2tog (i.e. you purl together the last stitch in MC and the yo in CC - connecting the two), turn work
- RS, MC: yo, k to beginning of round
Rounds 7 and 8 = Rounds 5 and 6

The chart below shows the color pattern for both socks.
Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on
Intarsia pattern - click to enlarge



Repeat rounds 1 to 8 until the sock is as long as you'd like it to be - don't forget to insert scrap yarn for an afterthought heel when the foot part of your sock is long enough.

Finish a sock with a few rounds of k2-p2-ribbing.
Insert an afterthought heel.

Weave in ends.


Battenberg socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on




Kommentare:

  1. When you look at a human foot that does make perfect sense - and they look like they fit beautifully

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  2. Great name for socks. I thought you might like to see my Battenburg socks that I made a few years ago. Yours also look like racing socks to me. http://ginxcraft.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/battenburg-ankle-socks.html

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  3. What a great pair of socks. The motif works perfectly. Probably helps that I'm partial to a slice of battenburg.

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  4. Great socks! I love the toe decreases. My toes slant like that so I frequently start decreasing on one side before the other. Obviously, I tend to knit top down. :)

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  5. Very cute socks, I have been wanting toes that fit more! Thanks for the pattern sketch!

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