Mittwoch, 23. Dezember 2020

Crossings Shawl

I've always wanted to created a half-circle(-ish) shawl in brioche, but it took me a while to think of a pattern with the appropriate number of increases. 

In general,  Two-colour brioche is a marvellous technique. It creates a lovely, squishy texture that is comforable to wear and it can be used to create quite intricate geometric patterns. 

This shawl is started with only a few stitches at the top center and knitted (and increased) outward. That way the size is easily adaptable - and the pattern can also be used for a different yarn weight.





The pattern PDF is available on


The pattern PDF is 8 pages long and contains:

  • row-by-row pattern instructions
  • photo tutorials for the brioche increases and decreases you need for this piece:
    • brk2inc – a brioche increase
    • brkX – brioche stitch that creates the lattice effect

If you want to knit this pattern you should know how to knit flat two-colour brioche.


To knit this shawl you need the following materials: 

  • a total of 360 grams (or 1550 metres) of fingering weight yarn – in two (semi-)solid colours:
    I used Zwerger Opal Uni Solid – in the following colourways  
    • DY: 5192 dunkelbraun (dark brown) 
    • LY: 9932 himmelblau (light blue)
    • You can use a different yarn weight – the only thing that you have to adapt is the needle size (slightly bigger than the yarn calls for)
  • 3.75 mm knitting needles – preferably long circulars 
  • 4 stitch markers
  • a tapestry needle for weaving in ends
This gave me a shawls that measures about 62 cm in depth  and about 170 cm in width (measured from tip to tip).

WS of Crossings Shawl
WS of Crossings Shawl



Samstag, 28. November 2020

Sideways Cardigan

Usually I don't buy bigger amounts of the same yarn unless I have a specific project in mind. However, a few years ago I made an exception when there was a sale at Vilfil (my favorite yarn store in Zurich) and among the items for sale was Noro Furin. At the time I bought a whole pack (10 skeins) - and it was in my stash for quite a long time, because I didn't have a good idea how to use it.
Last year in April, I decided to use it to knit a cardigan - sideways and in one piece because I don't like cutting my yarn or and I like to minimize the finishing work (e.g. sewing pieces together). Plus, with variegated yarn, I don't like the abrupt color changes that can occur when putting on the arms.
In the end it took me to August 2019 to finish knitting it - and to the following January to finally sew up the arms and to attach the buttons. ...  And now it's taken me nearly a year to write down the instructions.  So, here's a tutorial on how to do something similar.


As with my other sweater patterns (e.g. Summer Garter Stitch Top and Waterfall Tunic) this is NOT a stitch-by-stitch pattern with stitch and row counts for various sizes but rather a tutorial on how to do something similar.
You will have to swatch and calculate for yourself. So this cardigan is completely configurable to your wishes and your shape. I will however give you my numbers and calculations as an example (written in purple).

The basic idea for stitch pattern (changing the skein and alternating between garter and stockinette stitch) is stolen from Lanesplitter Skirt by Tina Whitmore - because it is such great way to show off the color changes of the variegated yarn that I used.







Materials
  • yarn, I used about 470 grams of Aran Weight yarn (Noro Furin, colorway 4 - here's a link to the yarn's Ravelry page), 
  • straight or circular knitting needles, I used 4.5mm needles - mine were 100 cm long.
  • removable stitch markers (safety pins or scrap yarn work fine as well)
  • 3 buttons, and sewing needle and thread to sew them on



Techniques


Construction, Measurements, and Calculations

The cardigan is knitted sideways and in one piece. It starts with the left sleeve is knitted up to the shoulder. Then (with knitted COs on both sides) the piece is widened to create the front and back piece of the cardigan). At each end short rows are used to shape the piece (i.e. to make sure it is wide enough to fit around your waist). When you've reached the width of your shoulder, you bind off the stitches on the front part and start to knit a "back-only" part. This starts with a few decreases at the top to get a round neckline at the neck edge. 
Once you've reached the middle (or centerline), you basically knit everything backwards, i.e. a mirror image of the first half. This means that just before you've reached the intended neckwidith, you  increases at the neck edge, then you do a knitted CO to start the front right part. Then you continue to knit the front and back (right part) at the same time. After a bind off at both sides you knit the right sleeve as a mirror image to the left one.
In the end, you pick up stitches along the inner edge of the front parts and the neckline (green line in figure 1) to knit a collar with button holes.

Construction
Figure 1: Construction

You need to take the following measurements:
A = arm circumference at wrist
B = arm circumference at shoulder
C = from shoulder to hip (total length of garment)
D = from under arm to hip (or C-B/2)
E = depth of neckline on the back of the garment

F = arm length
G = width of shoulder seam
H = half of the width of neckline
I = width of one side of the cardigan at your hip (for me H=I/2)
J = width at hip (should be roughly half of your hip circumference)


Figure 2: Measurements

Knit a swatch and calculate the stitch and row numbers according to your measurements!
Alternatively, with a rough idea of your gauge, you can start with the arm piece and use this as your swatch - however, this swatch piece has then not been blocked and/or washed and might be less exact than you'd like it to be ... and maybe you'll need to frog it after knitting half a sleeve (i.e. you've just knitted a bigger swatch ;-(.
So, better just knit a swatch and block it.

Here are my calculations for stitch numbers and ridges - rounded. My swatch measured 18 sts for 10 cm in width and 30 rows (in pattern) for 10 cm in height.

A = 22 cm = 40 sts
B = 42 cm = 72 sts
C = 60 cm = 108 sts
D = 60 cm - 21 cm = 39 cm - or 108 sts - 36 sts = 72 sts
E =  1,5 cm =  3 sts
 
F = 45 cm = 135 rows
G = 10 cm = 30 rows
H = 10 cm = 30 rows
I = 25 cm = 75 rows
J = 50 cm = 150 rows


Before you start ...
  • The 2nd half of one piece (right side) is the exact mirror of the 1st part (left side). So it's essential to take notes while you're knitting, in order to be able to knit the same rows in the opposite order (i.e. decreases where you increased, BO where you CO'd etc.)
  • Since I am not "busty" I didn't make allowance for bust shaping. This can be done by starting the front side short rows higher up in the rows or by inserting short rows at bust height that act as bust darts (as I did in the No Assembly Required Top).


Instructions

Throughout the pattern you alternate skeins of variegated yarn (skeins S1 and S2).

The basic stitch pattern for the sleeves (without the calculated increases) is:
  • two rows in stockinette stitch in S1, 
  • two rows in garter stitch (i.e. one garter ridge) in S2, 
  • four rows in stockinette stitch in S1, 
  • two rows in garter stitch (i.e. one garter ridge) in S2.
Or spelled out: 
Row 1 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 2 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end    // stockinette part, S1
Row 3 (RS), S2): sl1, k to end
Row 4 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end    // garter ridge, S2
Row 5 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 6 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end
Row 7 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 8 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end    // stockinette part, S1
Row 9 (RS), S2): sl1, k to end
Row 10 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end    // garter ridge, S2

The stitch pattern for the body is similar
  • two rows in stockinette stitch in S1 - with some (calculated) short rows at the beginning and end of the row
  • two rows in garter stitch (i.e. one garter ridge) in S2
So, when you finish a part, make sure that you continue in pattern, i.e. if you've finished the first sleeve on a garter ridge (in S2), start the main body in stockinette (S1) - my examples below might differ from that.


Left Sleeve

CO A stitches with S1
Instead of ribbing, knit several rigdes of garter stitch, alternating the skeins after each ridge.
I did a CO of 46 stitches and knit 4 ridges in garter stitch.

You now have to calculate the increases you have to do in order to reach B stitches at the shoulder.
I wanted to reach 72 stitches at the shoulder, i.e. I had to increase by 13 ((72-46)/2 =  26/2 = 13) on each side (beginning and end of row) - and I had 128 rows to reach that (D=136 rows, minus 8 rows already knitted for the "instead-of-ribbing"). So I decided had to do increases every 10th row (i.e. that would give 130 rows, but this difference (1cm) was OK for me).

Start knitting the stitch pattern above and increase (as calculated at the beginning and end of the rows)
As calculated I knitted the pattern and increased at the beginning and end of every 10th row, i.e. after 130 I had 13x2 = 26 sts more than the CO, i.e. 46+26 = 72 sts.

To help me count the rows of the body part and to measure, I marked the last row of the sleeve with a removable stitch marker.


Body (Back Piece and Two Front Pieces)

Left Half 
Knit the next row, at the end of the row, with a knitted cast-on, CO D stitches for the front.
Then turn, knit back and CO D stitches for the back.

I wanted to add 39 cm to the lenght (added to the sleeve width - back and front), so I CO'd 72 sts on each side.

Since you're knitting sideways and the shoulders are narrower than the piece around the hips, you now have to calculate the amount of short rows to knit at the front and the back. Plus, you have to decide where you want your short rows to end.

The short rows for the front piece are calculated by the ratio of G to I (i.e. shoulder width to width at the hip of one half).
And the short rows for the back piece by the ratio of G+H to J/2 (i.e. shoulder width plus half of the neckline width to half of the width at the hip.

This means, that you have more short rows on the front than on the back.

For the front I had G = 10 cm and I=25 cm, i.e. for each shoulder ridge, I had to knit 2,5 ridges on the lower edge, i.e. a ratio of 1:2,5 or 2:5
For the back it was G+H=10+10= 20 cm and J/2 = 50/2 = 25 cm. So I had the ratio of 2:2,5 or 4:5.

I wanted to keep the pattern of 1 garter ridge and stockinette rows inbetween.
So, taking into account the short rows calculated above, I ended up with this pattern, but I varied the points where I did the w+t's a bit.

Row 1 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 2 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end  // garter stitch ridge
Row 3 (RS), S1): sl1, k to end
Row 4 (WS, S1): sl1, p65, w+t
Row 5 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 6 (WS, S1): sl1, p40, w+t
Row 7 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 8 (WS, S1): sl1, p15, w+t
Row 9 (RS, S1): k to end   
Row 10 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end  // stockinette part with short rows in front
Repeat rows 1 to 10 once, after you've the last row for the 2nd time, continue with 
Row 21 (RS, S1): sl1, k35, w+t
Row 22 (WS, S1): p to end   // stockinette part plus short rows in the back
I knitted these rows 4 times, i.e. until the shoulder was wide enough.

Knit the calculated pattern until you've reach the shoulder width. 
Now you have to BO the stitches on the front part, i.e. knit to the end of an RS row and BO C stitches.
In my case I had to BO 108 sts. So I knitted an RS row, and started the WS with binding off 108 sts.
 
Now that you've reached the neck of the piece and have done a BO of the front stitches, you need to knit only the part of the rows, that is on the back of the cardigan. 
For me that meant skipping the rows that were called row 4 to row 9 in the body pattern above, i.e. the following: 
Row 1 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 2 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end   // garter stitch ridge
Row 3 (RS), S1): sl1, k to end
Row 4 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end   // stockinette rows
Repeat rows 1 to 4 once more. After you've the last row for the 2nd time, continue with 
Row 9 (RS, S1): sl1, k35, w+t
Row 10 (WS, S1): p to end   // stockinette part plus short rows in the back 

However, if you want to have a slight curve in the back of the neckline, you have to do some decreases at the end of the first RS rows to shape a curve in your neck. 
I wanted a curve that was 1,5 cm deep, so over the first 6 rows, I decreased one stitch every other row, i.e. I knitted up to the last three stitches of a RS row and ended with "ssk, k1".

Knit your calculated pattern until you've reached exactly the centerline of your piece.
I ended on a stockinette row in S2. For a nice symmetry (and to stay "in pattern") I knitted one garter stitch ridge in S1.


Right Half
After reaching the middle of your piece, you basically have to knit a mirror image of the 1st half, i.e. 
  • you increase where you decreased before, 
  • you to a BO where you did a CO before (and vice versa), 
  • you knit the same short rows as before - just in reverse order.
So first you knit the back part only.

For me this meant the following for rows 1 to 10 of the back-only part.
Row 1 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 2 (WS, S1):, p to end   
Row 3 (RS, S1): sl1, k35, w+t
Row 4 (RS, S1): p to end      // stockinette part plus short rows in the back 
Row 5 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 6 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end   // garter stitch ridge
Row 7 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 8 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end   // stockinette rows
Row 9 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 10 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end      // garter stitch ridge

Plus, just before you finish the back-only part, you need to include some increases at the upper edge (to mirror the decreases you did during the right half.
For me that meant that - starting from the 6th row before I had to do the BO, I increased one stitch every other row, i.e. I knitted up to the last two stitches of a RS row and ended with "kfb, k1".

Then you need to CO the front stitches again, i.e. knit an RS row and then do a knitted CO of the calculated number of stitches.
I knitted an RS row, then continued by casting on 108 stitches 

Knit the same pattern you knitted for the left half in reverse order until you've reached the shoulder width.
For me that meant knitting the following sequence
Row 1 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 2 (WS, S1): sl1, p15, w+t
Row 3 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 4 (WS, S1): sl1, p40, w+t
Row 5 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 6 (WS, S1): sl1, p65, w+t
Row 7 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 8 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end
Row 9 (RS, S1): sl1, k35, w+t
Row 10 (WS, S1): p to end     // stockinette "ridge" with short rows front and back
Row 11 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 12 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end    // garter ridge
Row 13 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 14 (WS, S1): sl1, p15, w+t
Row 15 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 16 (WS, S1): sl1, p40, w+t
Row 17 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 18 (WS, S1): sl1, p65, w+t
Row 19 (RS, S1): k to end
Row 20 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end    // stockinette "ridge" with short rows only in front 
Row 21 (RS, S2): sl1, k to end
Row 22 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end    // garter ridge

Once you've reached the shoulder width of the right shoulder, knit to the end of the row, turn and BO D stitches (front), and knit to end. Then BO D stitches (back). The number of stitches that you have left now should be exactly the number you had when you finished the first sleeve.
For me that meant:
Row 1: sl1, k to end
Row 2: BO72, k to end
Row 3: BO72


Right Sleeve

The right sleeve is the left sleeve knitted backwards, i.e. knitting the stitch pattern in reverse order and doing decreases where you did increases before.
Knit in pattern (with the decreases) until your right sleeve has the same length than the left.

I knitted the sleeve stitch pattern in reverse order ...
Row 1 (RS), S2): sl1, k to end
Row 2 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end   // garter ridge
Row 3 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 4 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end
Row 5 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 6 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end  // stockinette part
Row 7 (RS), S2): sl1, k to end
Row 8 (WS, S2): sl1, k to end   // garter ridge
Row 9 (RS, S1): sl1, k to end
Row 10 (WS, S1): sl1, p to end   // stockinette part

... while I did decreases at the beginning and end of every 10th row.

Then finish with the same "ribbing" you did on your left sleeve and bind off (loosely).
In my case that meant knitting 4 ridges of garter stitch alternating the skeins.


Collar

Pick up stitches all along the inner edge on the left front, the neck and the right edge in front (see green line in figure 1 above).

Knit (back and forth) 3 ridges of garter stitch.

Calculate the size of your button holes and decide where you want to put the buttons, i.e. decide on the distance between two buttons and calculate the appropriate number of stitches.

Knit up to the 1st button hole, BO the number of stitches for 1 button, k to the next button hole, BO the number of stitches for 1 button
 
The buttons I bought had a diameter of 2,5cm, so I decided that I'd make my button holes 4 sts wide and I decided that I'd place them within the lowest 20 cm, i.e 40 sts, 
So I knitted the "botton hole ridge" as follows:
sl1, k7, BO4, k10, BO4, k10 BO4, k to end; 
sl1, k up to first BO, CO4, k10, CO4, k10, CO4, k to end

Knit 3 more ridges of garter stitch, BO during the last row.


Finishing
I prefer to block the finished piece (sewn up) rather than the flattened out version. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages.

Sew the side underarm seams together and the buttons on. Weave in ends.
Sew on buttons and block the piece.



Donnerstag, 19. November 2020

Retstrikkede Fingervanter - All Fingers and Thumbs Gloves in Danish

Marianne Holmen from strikkeglad.dk has written another Danish translation for one of my patterns - this time for the All Fingers and Thumbs Gloves. Mange Tak!

The Danish translation can be found here.
The original (english) version of this pattern is available here.







A list of all translated versions of my patterns can be found in this blogpost.

Freitag, 13. November 2020

Perpendicularity Mitts

 I love fingerless gloves. They are my favorite accessory – and knitting project. They are fun to knit and wear, and on top of that  they are so versatile – especially in terms of construction, which shows off nicely, if you use variegated or self-striping yarn. 

These mitts are constructed in seven parts, each of which either starting with a provisional CO or by picking up stitches from the edge, and some are finished by a three-needle BO (three times) and (the last one) by grafting in garter stitch. 

This means that the mitts are knitted in one piece each – so you only have to weave in two ends for each glove. 






The pattern is available on



This pattern PDF is 13 pages long and contains 

  • written row-by-row instructions for knitting these fingerless gloves in one size – including 21 photos of the different stages
  • explanations how to adapt the pattern to other sizes
  • a schematic how the mitts are constructed
  • short photo tutorials of the following techniques:
    • provisional cast-on and how to undo it
    • three-needle bind-off
    • picking up and knitting stitches from the edge of your knitting
    • picking up stitches from gaps (e.g. necessary after changes in direction)
    • short rows with wrap and turn 
    • grafting in garter stitch


To knit these fingerless gloves you need the following materials:
  • about 35 to 40 grams of fingering weight yarn 
  • 3mm needles, for fingerless gloves such as these, I tend to switch between dpns and circulars, but it's possible to use either of them
  • one surplus knitting needle (of the same size (3mm))
  • scrap yarn and a crochet hook (about 3mm) for the provisional COs
  • a stitch holder for the thumb stitches (scrap yarn works well, too)
  • 3 stitch markers and a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2020

Diamond Lattice Cowl

Two-colour brioche is a marvellous technique. It creates a lovely, squishy texture that is comforable to wear and it can be used to create quite intricate geometric patterns.

This cowl is knitted in the round with diamond shapes in a lattice pattern. 


 



The pattern is available via


The pattern PDF is 9 pages long and contains

  • row-by-row instructions
  • a chart of one pattern repeat
  • photo tutorials of the brioche increases and decreases that you need for this cowl
    • brk2Ldec (left-leaning brioche decrease)
    • brk2Rdec (right-leaning brioche decrease)
    • brk2inc (brioche increase)
    • brkX (brioche stitch that creates the lattice effect) 
If you want to knit this pattern, you should already know how to knit two-colour brioche in the round.


You need the following materials to knit this cowl:

  • about 260 to 300 grams of DK weight yarn (in total) – in two colours: I used two (semi-)solid yarns: Supertwist by Nurturing Fibres (link to the yarn's Ravelry page):
    • as LY I used light grey (colorway “Driftwood”) 
    • as DY I used pink (colorway “Ouma's Quilt”) 
  • 4.5 mm circular knitting needles
  • 22 stitch markers – one of them different
  • a tapestry needle for weaving in ends



Samstag, 3. Oktober 2020

Sideways Pumpkins

 After a few really warm days in September, it's finally getting colder and wetter outside. For me, that's the moment where I really like to stay inside, make myself comfortable and have it cozy. Part of this is a bit of seasonal decoration and somehow the pumpkin is the ultimate autumn decoration (even though I cannot remember eating it as a child). That's why I decided to knit little decorative pumpkins, using old  yarn that was already in my stash. (The light orange ones are made from yarn, that was leftover when my Mum knitted a sweater in the 70ies :) 

As it is my usual go-to construction (e.g. here or here), I knitted them sideways - starting with a provisional CO, shaping the piece with short rows and finishing by grafting in garter stitch. If you want to learn one of these techniques, this might be a project to learn.

This is a project a bit like my little knitted hearts (Herzchen) - once you start knitting them, you cannot stop :)


Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.





Size

The pumpkins I knitted measured between 6 and 11 cm in diameter - depending on yarn (fingering, to fingering held double) and needles that I used (2.25 to 3.5 mm).


Materials

  • yarn – basically leftovers - I different kinds of yarn – and self-striping fingering weight yarn)
  • knitting needles – dpns knitting needles, circulars or AddiTrios (both will work for the flat piece and for the i-cord), always smaller needles than the yarn called for – in order to get a tight texture, e.g. 2.25 mm for fingering weight yarn or 3.5 mm for fingering yarn held doubly
  • a crochet hook (for the provisional cast-on)
  • stuffing - I used the yarn ends and fabric scraps that I had saved from previous knitting or sewing projects
  • a tapestry needle for grafting and weaving in ends


Techniques



Instructions

Pumpkin

With scrap yarn, do a provisional CO of 18 stitches and with your working yarn (see illustration 1), knit the setup row (k all, see illustration 2).

Ridge 1 (RS/WS): sl, k1, kfb, k1, kfb, k2, kfb, k2, kfb, k1, kfb, k1, kfb, k1, w+t, k20 (or k to 2 bef end), w+t
Ridge 2 (RS/WS): k5, kfb, k8, kfb, k3 (i.e. 4 bef end), w+t, k15,  (i.e. 7 bef end) w+t
Ridge 3 (RS/WS): k10, w+t, k13 (i.e. 4 bef end), w+t
Ridge 4 (RS/WS): k15, w+t, k11, w+t
Ridge 5 (RS/WS): k10, w+t, k12 (i.e. 6 bef end), w+t
Ridge 6 (RS/WS): k14 (i.e. 6 bef end), w+t, k15 (i.e. 5 bef end), w+t
Ridge 7 (RS/WS): k1, ssk, k10, ssk, k1 (i.e. 5 bef end), w+t, k11, w+t
Ridge 8 (RS/WS): k10, w+t, k15 (i.e. 3 bef end), w+t
Ridge 9 (RS/WS): ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1 (i.e. 3 bef end), w+t, k14 (i.e. 1 bef end), w+t
Ridge 10: k17, turn, sl1, k17 (i.e. to end)

Illustrations
After the first repeat of these 10 ridges you're back to 18 stitches on your needles and the piece will look similar to illustration 3.

Repeat ridges 1 to 10 four more times, then knit ridges 1 to 8 - and a slightly altered version of ridge 9 (i.e. ridge 9b), knitting the WS row to end - or spelled out: 

Ridge 9b (RS/WS): ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, ssk, k1, w+t, k to end

Remove the scrap yarn of the provisional CO and catch the stitches on a knitting needle. As you can see on illustration 4, the right edge of the piece is 6 rows high. That's why you first have to close up the (potential) hole at the end of the row. Then start grafting the live stitches together in garter stitch. 

When you've closed about two thirds of the row, fill the pumpkin with stuffing. Continue grafting in garter stitch to the end of the row. With the same tail, close the other (potential) hole. Then stick the needle right through the middle of the piece, and then back (illustration 5). Pull the yarn tight. That will make the piece a bit flatter and therefore more pumpkin shaped. Secure tail and weave in ends.

Please note:

  • It may be helpful to mark the RS of the piece.
  • When I knitted these, I sometimes miscounted my stitches. This doesn't really matter, as long as you're not too far out (and anyway, real pumpkins aren't completely symmetrical, are they?). But that's why I've included the instructions until which stitch some of the ridges are to be knitted (e.g. k to 2 bef end). This may help you to get back in sync with the pattern after having miscounted.


Stem

In contrasting yarn, knit an i-cord (of 5 stitches) of about 12 rows (or however long you want the stem), cut yarn, but leave a tail that's long enough to sew stem to pumpkin.

Use the tail to sew the stem to the pumpkin (illustration 6) and weave in ends.


Samstag, 12. September 2020

Rainbow Mitts

It's been a while since I published the last fingerless glove pattern (to be precise, it was published in May 2018, my Color Explosion Mitts). However, fingerless gloves are my favorite kind of knitted items because they are so versatile - especially in terms of construction - and this is great when using variegated yarn.

And this is exactly what I did for these fingerless gloves; they are knitted in different directions and in one piece – so you only have to weave in two ends for each glove.








The pattern is available 

The PDF is 10 pages long and contains:
  • a schematic how the mitts are constructed
  • written row-by-row instructions for knitting these fingerless gloves (including 8 photos of the different stages) for one size (21 cm high with a circumference of 17 cm at the wrist edge and of 16 cm at the fingers)
  • explanations how to adapt the pattern to other sizes
  • short photo tutorials of the following techniques
    • provisional cast on (with a crochet hook) and how to undo it
    • three-needle bind-of
    • picking up and knitting stitches from the edge of your knitting
    • picking up stitches from gaps (e.g. necessary when changing knitting direction(
    • short rows with shadow wraps



To knit this pattern the following techniques are used:
  • provisional CO and how to undo it
  • three needle BO
  • picking up stitches from the edge of a knitted piece
  • short rows with shadow wraps
  • picking up stitches from a gap (e.g. when doing a thumb gusset)
For all these techniques/skills, the pattern PDF contains photo tutorials. 


You need the following materials to knit these fingerless mitts
  • about 35 to 40 grams of fingering weight yarn (I used Schoeller Esslinger Wolle, Sockenwolle, Color 0008 "Regenbogen-bunt" - here's the link to the yarn's Ravelry page)
  • 3mm needles, for fingerless gloves such as these, I tend to switch between dpns and circulars, but it's possible to use either of them
  • in case you only use circulars, you'll a third knitting needle in a similar size for the three-needle BO, 
  • a stitch holder for the thumb stitches (scrap yarn works well, too)
  • 2 stitch markers
  • scrap yarn and a crochet hook (about 3mm) for the provisional CO
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends


Montag, 17. August 2020

Seven Petals Potholder

After finishing my Daisy Potholders I wanted to knit a flower with a petal contour - and so I started experimenting - and surprisingly enough, it worked.
So, here is the pattern for a flower-shaped potholder, hotpad or coaster. It starts with a provisional CO, is knitted in short row wedges and finished with grafting in garter stitch.
Since this is an intarsia project with three colours that also uses short rows, it can be quite fiddly. It is NOT a beginner pattern.







The pattern is available 

The pattern PDF is 12 pages long and contains
  • written row-by-row instructions for knitting this piece – including four photos of the different stages 
  • a pattern chart of one wedge
  • short photo tutorials for the following techniques
    • provisional CO with a crochet hook and how to undo it
    • grafting in garter stitch
    • short rows with wrap and turn and picking up the wraps 
    • intarsia knitting 
    • weaving in yarn while carrying it (backwards and forwards)
  • photo tutorials and step-by-step explanations of
  • undoing the provisional CO in this pattern (i.e. catching stitches in different colours)
  • grafting this piece – with a decrease and colour changes
Of the 12 pages, the pattern instructions and chart comprise only 3 pages - the rest are the technique tutorials and explanations of their specific application for this motif.

Since it's an intarsia pattern, it looks OK from WS as well (see picture below).


To knit one of these pieces you need the following materials
  • Cotton yarn in three colors – I knitted these potholders in Aran and Sports weight yarn
    • for Aran, I used a total of 30 grams
    • for Sports weight, I used a total of 20 grams
  • knitting needles – straight or circulars: I used 3mm needles for Aran weight yarn and 2.5mm needles for Sports weight yarn, i.e. smaller than the yarn usually requires because I wanted a firm texture. 
  • scrap yarn and a crochet hook (about 3mm) for the provisional CO
  • two tapestry needles for grafting and to weave in ends
The pieces I knitted measure 16 cm to 22 cm in diameter - depending on the yarn weight I used.




Sonntag, 26. Juli 2020

"Darn it!" or Kintsugi

My Cable Experiment Mitts (one of my first ever knitting patterns published back in 2012) were my favorite fingerless gloves to wear - even though they are quite plain and I have knitted far more interesting pairs of fingerless gloves ...

Quite a while ago, I ripped a hole into the upper edge. (In fact, I had to scroll quite far down in my Instagram feed to find out that this happened was in November 2015 - i.e. nearly five years ago).
Back then, somebody pointed me towards the idea of Kintsugi (金継ぎ, "golden joinery") - a Japanese technique to mend broken pottery with gold in way that the crack is still visible, but beautifully so.
Translated to knitting, it meant for me that I wanted to mend it with a beautiful shiny yarn, that would stand out from the dark brown (and cheap) sock yarn that I had used to knit the mitts.
But to mend something like that you really need your concentration and to be in the right state of mind. So I put the ripped mitts safely away ...

This weekend I felt a bit uninspired (or lazy) to continue any of my current knitting projects, so I thought, I might just try to mend these old mitts. First I had to search for them - I had moved house inbetween - so that was OK. Afterwards, I looked for video tutorials on YouTube to teach me the basics of mending knitware. I found this Video by KNIT Freedom and watched it.

Finally, I started the actual mending - using Araucania Botany Lace (here's the yarn's Ravelry page, leftovers from a Hitchhiker scarf I knitted back in 2012). It is fiddly work, especially since I hadn't done this before - and I had to undo bits of it and redo them. I even managed to sew both sides together once :( But in the end it worked, now everything is secure and wearable again.
Here's how it looks ...


Considering that this is the first time, I've ever tried to darn or mend a piece of knitted fabric, I'm quite happy - even though I had hoped it would turn out a bit neater.
And I'm even tempted to make the patch a bit bigger or to put some more embroidery on the upper edge of the piece, because I really like the contrast of the two yarns.

Sonntag, 19. Juli 2020

Garter Stitch Bias Top

I love garter stitch. If you use self-striping yarn, you can make it stand out with unusual constructions - so that you can create quite interesting garments (e.g. Summertime Garter Stitch Top, No Assembly Required Top) or accessories (e.g. Color Explosion Mitts, Little Rectangles Scarf, Patchwork Cowl).
Another feature of garter stitch is that one ridge (2 rows) of garter stitch are basically as high as one stitch is wide. That way, you can easily put pieces of garter stitch together at right angles. And that's what I did with this piece.
This top is knitted on a 45 degree bias - and except for the arms - it is knitted in one piece.  It has a V-neck in front, this V is partially filled in the back.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.



This is NOT a row-by-row pattern in different sizes. It is a rough tutorial to construct a similar garment yourself - explaining the measurements to take and the underlying calculations to make. This means that you can use other yarn weights as well.

Even though, the calculations involved seem a bit complicated at first, the actual knitting is straight-forward (garter stitch with a increases and decreases). Plus, the only real calculations you need, have to be done right at the beginning (when you calculate your COs)  - and here I've given several examples. The rest can be done by measuring your piece as you go along.


Materials
  • yarn, I used about 8,5 skeins of Lana Grossa, Linea Pura A Mano (here's the yarn's Ravelry page), which amounts to about 950 meters of cotton DK weight yarn - since this is a tutorial that explains the calculations you can use other yarn weights as well. I think the design looks best in variegated yarn.
  • knitting needles that suit the yarn (I used 4mm circulars - with quite a long cable)
  • a crochet hook, roughly the same size as the knitting needles (I used a 4mm hook)
  • quite a few stitch markers - scrap yarn works fine
  • scrap yarn - as stitch holder for the arm stitches
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends
  • a piece of paper or cardboard - big enough to measure half of the width of the shirt and from your shoulder to under your arm (for me an A4 piece of paper was enough)
  • a notepad, to take notes while you're knitting


Techniques
  • Crochet Cast On: basically the same as a provisional CO with a crochet hook - except that you use your working yarn and that in the you put the stitch that is still on the hook on the knitting needle. Here's a YouTube video by KnitPurlHunter that explains the technique.
    There are two cast ons - one at the beginning of part 1 (the left part) and one at the beginning of part 4. To make sure, that both sides look the same, I used a crochet cast on for both.
  • Short rows with wrap and turn (w+t) - as shown in this YouTube video by Very Pink Knits.
  • Pick up and knit: Picking up stitches from the side edge of your work as shown in this YouTube video by B.Hooked Crochet & Knitting
  • Picking up stitches from a gap or ditch: After separating the arm stitches, going on knitting and then picking up the arm stitches again, there usually is a gap under the arm. This gap can be closed by picking up a couple of stitches. An example of how to pick up gap stitches in a top-down raglan sweater is shown in a YouTube video by The Chilly Dog.

Measuring, Swatching and Calculating

Start by knitting a swatch to find out how many ridges and stitches you need to knit a 10 x 10 cm square.
With my swatch I had 20 stitches for 10 cm in width and 20 ridges (40 rows of garter stitch) for 10 cm in height.

Knit a swatch - don't rely on the yarn label for the calculations for this sweater. If you don't knit a swatch, you'll probably end up ripping back, i.e. knitting a bigger swatch :/

Then take your and decide on your measurements.
A = depth of your V-neck (front) = half of your neck width (since you are knitting on a 45 degree bias, these will be the same)
B = shoulder (from neck opening to shoulder head)
C = depth of neck in the back
D = width of your shirt, this is a boxy shirt (without any shaping around the bust or waist), so take the widest measurement around your torso
E = shoulder to under arm
F = height (shoulder seam to bottom hem)


Since you're knitting on the bias (45 degrees, i.e. your calculations are based on a right-angled isosceles triangle), the width and length that you measure needs to be multiplied by √2 (square root of 2 or roughly multiply by 1.41) to get the stitch numbers.
And if you want to calculate how many "biased" centimetres give you how many centimetres (or ridges) in your measurements you have to divide by √ (i.e. roughly divide by 1.41).

I wanted the following measurements - and with my gauge 1 cm equalled exactly 2 stitches or 2 garter stitch ridges (that's where the first "2 *" comes from).
A = 11 cm: 2 * 11 = 22 ; 22 *  2 stitches = 22 * 1.41 stitches = 28 stitches
B = 10 cm: 2 * 10  = 20; 20  /  2 ridges  = 20 /1.41 ridges =  14 ridges
C = 3 cm: 2 * 3 = 6; 6 *  2 stitches = 6 * 1.41 = 8.5 stitches
D = 50 cm: 2 * 50 = 100; 100  /  2 ridges  = 100 /1.41 ridges = 71 ridges
E = 20 cm: 2 * 20 = 40; 40  * 2 stitches = 40 x 1.41 stitches = 56 stitches
F = 55 cm: 2 * 55 = 110; 110 /   2 ridges  = 110 /1.41 ridges = 78 ridges

When you decide on the width of the neck (A), I'd advise to err on the generous side, because it's nearly impossible to widen the neck afterwards - but it would be possible to make it a bit narrower, e.g. with a crochet edge. (Believe me, I had to frog it once ... while I was knitting part 4 and detected that the neckline felt too small.)



Construction / Parts

This top is basically knitted in one piece (except for the arms). The picture below shows the construction and parts - it only gives you a front view, but during most parts you'll knit both on the front and back of your piece at one time.

  • Part 1: Cast on for the back neckline and the left side of the V neck as well as the triangle in the back just below the neckline. This triangle is created with short rows and decreases.
  • Part 2: Left shoulder - knitted back and forth over the shoulder while increasing
  • Part 3: After putting the left arm stitches on a stitch holder, Underarm left hand side - knitted back and forth under the left arm
  • Part 4: Main body part - started by picking up stitches from the edge of parts 2 and 3 and - in the middle a cast on for right side of neck, right shoulder, then knitted back and forth over the right shoulder
  • Part 5: Underarm right hand side - after putting the stitches of the right arm on a stitch holder
  • Part 6: Arms

Instructions

Part 1: CO and Triangle at the Back of Neck

Calculate the number of stitches for the left half of the front of the V, the left half of the back neckline and the horizonal part of the back neckline (for details see Section "Calculations" below). After you've done these calculations, you've done the worst part of the "maths" bit (and I've given you some example calculations below) ... the rest can be done by measuring the piece as you go along.

CO the calculated number of stitches with crochet CO.
(I used a crochet CO here, because there will be another CO - the right half of the V in the beginning of part 4 - where you only have 1 strand of yarn and you need an appropriate CO method for that. I wanted both halves to look the same. In my first (then frogged) try, I used a longtail CO in the beginning and knitted CO at the start of part 4 - next to one another these two CO methods looked just too different.

The CO consists of number of stitches for front neckline (A * √2), number of stitches for the back neckline (C * √2), and number of stitches for horizontal part of back neckline (2 * (A-C)). Place stitch markers after each part.
(For the next CO - at the beginning of part 4 - the calculation is a bit easier, it's only (A * √2) + (C * √2)).

I wanted A to be 11 cm - and C to be 3 cm. 
  • : 11 * 2 = 15,5 cm (with my gauge 31 sts)
  • 2: 3 2 = 4.25 cm (with my gauge 8.5, sts rounded to 9 sts)
  • 2 * (A-C) : 2*(11-3) = 2* 8 = 16 cm (with my gauge 32 sts)
Therefore my complete original CO (beginning of part 1) was 31 + 9 + 32 = 62 sts

Row 0 will start with the stitches for the front neckline; your stitch line-up is:
front neckline (A * √2), marker A (top of shoulder), back neckline (C * √2), marker B, horizontal part of neckline.

Row 0 (RS): k all

Now you're starting to knit a triangle of short rows.
Ridge 1 (WS/RS): sl1, k1, w+t, k to end
Ridge 2 (WS/RS): k1, ssk, w+t, k to end
Ridge 3 (WS/RS): sl1, k up to wrap, k1, w+t, k to end
Ridge 4 (WS/RS): sl1, k up to wrap, ssk, w+t, k to end

Repeat ridges 3 and 4 until the number of stitches on either side of stitch marker a are the same. This should (roughly) conincide with reaching stitch marker B since you're decreasing at every 2nd ridge. After a few repeats your piece should look similar to illustration 1.
You can remove stitch marker B now.
You're at the tip of the triangle you just knitted and the next row is a WS row.


Part 2: Left Shoulder

Row 0 (WS): sl1, k to end

Now you're starting to knit back and forth in garter stitch - increasing at the shoulder.
Row 1 (RS): sl1, k to 1 bef marker A, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to end
Row 2 (WS): sl1, k to end

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until the shoulder seam is as wide as you want it to be (i.e. until you've knitted  B/√ 2 ridges in part 2).
Place a removable stitch marker between the last ridge you knitted and the next to mark the row where you ended the above sequence (or make a note how many ridges you knitted up to now).

Then start the following sequence - which will give a slightly downward curve at the shoulder seam.
Row 3 (RS): sl1, k to 1 bef marker A, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to end
Row 4 (WS): sl1, k to end
Row 5 (RS): sl1, k to end
Row 6 (WS): sl1, k to end

Continue repeating rows 3 to 6 until you have enough rows to separate the arm stitches. 
While you're knitting, it might be helpful to mark the RS (with a removable stitch marker or some scrap yarn).

You can either calculate the number of ridges you need to knit until you have to separate the arm stitches (see calculations below - yes, they seem a bit complicated). Or you can cut out a piece of paper or cardborad with the following measurements:
  • width = half of the width of your shirt (D/2)
  • height = shoulder to underarm (E)
To measure, align you knitted piece (folded at the shoulder seam), so that the shoulder seam is at the upper edge and the tip of the V-neck is at the left edge (see illustation 3; the upper edge is marked with a light green line, the tip of the V-neck with a light green dot). Once you've reached the lower right hand corner of the piece of paper (indicated by the arrow), you can separate the arm stitches. (If you really, really want to know how the number of ridges could be calculated, I have provided this a the bottom of this post.)
Count the total number of ridges you knitted in part 2 and make a note of this. You'll need this information in part 4.


Calculated from the top of the shoulders, the arms should in theory be E * √ 2 stitches wide. However, since your arms hang downwards, you're not exacly knitting on a 45 degree bias anymore (but you're not yet knitting straight around the arm). Therefore the number of stitches you need to reach the width around the arm on that angle is lower than the stitches for E * √ 2, but higher than E. To get the number that's right for you, measure your piece and / or put it on. Then decide on a number of arm stitches somewhere between E and E * √ 2. Make a note of that number.

So, place temporary markers at that stitch at both sides of the shoulder.
On a WS row, knit up to the first temporary marker, put the stitches up to the next temporary marker on a big stitch holder or scrap yarn (while leaving marker A in), place a new middle marker (let's call it marker C) and continue knitting to the end of the row.

For me, E * 2 should have been 56 stitches (on the bias around the arm) and E (straight (not on the bias) around the arm) 40 stitches - the midpoint would be 48 stitches. Since garter stitch as a fabric is stretchy plus my yarn was stretchy too, I decided to make the arms a bit tighter and chose a width of 44 sts, i.e. I put temporary stitch markers 44 sts away from marker A at both sides of the piece (front and back) - then on a WS row I knitted up to the first temporary marker, put  2 * 44 sts (around marker A) my stitch holders, and finished the row.


Part 3: Left Underarm

Row 1 (RS): sl1, k to 2 bef marker C, ssk, slip marker C, k2tog, k to end
Row 2 (WS): sl1, k to end

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until there are only 4 sts left
Row 3 (RS): ssk, remove marker C, k2tog
Row 4 (WS): sl1, k1

Your piece should now look similar to illustration 4. The two stitches you have still on your needles will be the starting point of the stitches you're about to pick up.


Part 4: Main Body Part

Starting from the back and looking at the outside (RS) of your piece, pick up and knit one stitch for each ridge of the back diagonal edge.
When you reach the top of the filled triangle (of part 1), start a crochet CO of   C * √2 + A * √2 stitches - and place a marker (called marker D) after C * √2 stitches (i.e. at the top of the right shoulder). Then continue picking up and knitting stitches from the front of the diagonal edge. Your piece should now look similar to illustration 5 - and the number of stitches on either side of marker D should be the same.
(If there is a difference of one or two stitches on front and back, you can remedy that later in part 4 (Underarm Stitches) by leaving out one decrease (or two) just under the arm.)

In my case the new CO was 40 stitches - and I placed the marker after 9 sts.
  • 2: 3 2 = 4.25 cm (with my gauge 8.5, sts rounded to 9 sts)
  • : 11 * 2 = 15,5 cm (with my gauge 31 sts)


Now you can start the main part with an RS row - the front and back side of the piece will be connected while knitting (with k2tog at the end of each row). Even though your stitches could now be knitted in the round, you'll be knitting back and forth. The end will be clearly visible. There will be increases at the top of the shoulder and below the arm.

Row 1 (RS): yo, kfb, k to 1 bef marker D, kfb, slip marker, kfb, to to 2 bef end, kfb, k2tog
Row 2 (WS): yo, k to 1 bef end, k2tog

The k2tog at the end of each row, connects the last stitch of the row with the yo at the beginning, thereby connecting the sides.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until one of the following things happens (depending on your measurements, either may happen first.):
  1. the shoulder width (B) is reached.
  2. the intended length of you piece (F) is reached
When no 1 happens:
Change the RS rows in a way, that now you only do the increases at the top of the shoulder every 2nd RS row - so you have the same contour at the shoulder seam than in part 2
E.g.:
Row 3 (RS): yo, kfb, k to 1 bef marker D, kfb, slip marker, kfb, to to 2 bef end, kfb, k2tog 
Row 4 (WS): yo, k to 1 bef end, k2tog
Row 5 (RS):  yo, kfb, k to 2 bef end, kfb, k2tog
Row 6 (WS): yo, k to 1 bef end, k2tog

When no 2 happens:
Change the instructions in the beginning and end of the row in a way, that - instead of increasing and connecting - you now decrease (without connecting to the other side). That way you'll knit the lower hem.
E.g. (if no. 1 happened before)
Row 7 (RS): ssk, k to 1 bef marker D, kfb, slip marker, kfb, to to 2 bef end,  k2tog 
Row 8 (WS): p1, k to 1 end
Row 9 (RS):  ssk, k to 2 bef end, k2tog
Row 10 (WS): p1, k to 1 end

Here (and during part 5) you would also have the opportunity to shape the piece at the hem - for most people (me included) the hips are a bit wider. You could widen the lower hem by knitting a few short rows (symmetrical at the front and back of the piece). I didn't do this -  but I wanted to mention that it is possible.

Knit on until the total number of rows you knitted in part 4 equals the number you knitted in part 2, i.e. it's time to separate the arm stitches of the right arm.
Place temporary stitch markers at the number of arm stitches away (see part 2) from marker D. 
On a WS row, knit up to the first temporary marker, put the stitches up to the next temporary marker on a big stitch holder or scrap yarn (while leaving marker D in), place a new middle marker (let's call it marker F) and continue knitting to the end of the row.

Photo 6 shows how your piece should look after separating the arm stitches.

Part 4: Right Underarm

Row 1: ssk, k to 2 bef marker F, ssk, slip marker, k2tog, k to 2 bef end, k2tog
Row 2: p1, k to end

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until there are 8 sts or fewer left.
Row 3: knit only decrease stiches (e.g. ssk, ssk, k2tog, k2tog)
Row 4: p1, k to end
Row 5: knit only decrease stitches (e.g. ssk, k2tog)
Row 6: BO the remaining stitches


Part 6: Arms

First arm:
Put the stitches of one arm from the stitch holder to your knitting needles - and rearrange them, so that your row starts at the top of the shoulder (at the place of the stitch marker, that you left in). There will be a visible gap at the middle of the row just under the arm.

You start knitting at the inside (WS) of your piece.

Row 1 (WS): ssk, k to the middle of the row (just under the arm) and pick up an even number of stitches from the gap (I picked up 4 sts) and place a marker in the middle of the stitches you just picked up (called marker UA (underarm)), k to last 3 sts, yo, k1, k2tog

Row 2 (RS): ssk, drop yo of row below, k to 2 bef marker UA, ssk, slip marker, k2tog, k to last 3 sts, yo, k1, k2tog
Row 3 (WS): ssk, drop yo of row below, k to 3 bef end, yo, k1, k2tog

After working rows 2 and 3 once,  you can remove the marker at the top of the arm, since the end of row is clearly visible now.
The yo you do in one row and then drop in the next help to get a stretchier edge.

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until there are 8 sts or fewer left.
Row 3: knit only decrease stiches (e.g. ssk, ssk, k2tog, k2tog)
Row 4: p1, k to end
Row 5: knit only decrease stitches (e.g. ssk, k2tog)
Row 6: BO the remaining stitches

Repeat on second arm.

Back view - at the neckline you can see the short row triangle knitted in part 1


Calculations and Examples

All calculations below are based on the the Pythagorean theorem, that states "that the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares on the other two sides." (direct quote from Wikipedia)

Number of Stitches to COs

The pictures below show the COs of this pattern. In black the original CO that is done in the beginning of part 1 (for the left side of the front neck, and the back neckline - and in magenta the CO for the right side of the neckline. The schematic below shows the same from the top - with the grey dotted line as the shoulder seam/fold line.



So, the original CO is calcuted as follows:
2 + C 2 + 2*(A-C)

And the CO at the beginning of part 4 like this:
A * √2 + C * √2 

I wanted A to be 11 cm - and C to be 3 cm. 
  • : 11 * 2 = 15,5 cm (with my gauge 31 sts)
  • 2: 3 2 = 4.25 cm (with my gauge 8.5, sts rounded to 9 sts)
  • 2 * (A-C) : 2*(11-3) = 2* 8 = 16 cm (with my gauge 32 sts)
Therefore the complete original CO (beginning of part 1) was 31 + 9 + 32 = 62 sts
The CO at the beginning of part 4 was 31 + 9 =40 sts.


To create this neckline, there are only two dimensions that you can choose:
  • the depth of the front V (A)
  • the depth of the neckline in the back (C)
Because this is a right-angled triangle, the other sizes (widths) will follow.

Here are examples of the CO length for different values of A and C - in centimeters, where
  • "1st CO" is the length in centimetres of the CO at the beginning of part 1 (2 + C 2 + 2*(A-C)), 
  • "marker" indicates after how many centimetres you have to place the "top of the shoulder marker" (2 ) and 
  • "4th CO" the length in centimetres of the CO at the beginning of part 4 (2 + C ). I've rounded (up or down) to the next half centimetre.


C=1.5 cmC=3 cmC=5 cm
A = 10 cm1st CO: 33 cm
marker: 14 cm
4th CO: 16 cm
1st CO: 32 cm
marker: 14 cm
4th CO: 18,5 cm
1st CO: 31 cm
marker: 14 cm
4th CO: 21 cm
A = 11 cm1st CO: 36,5 cm
marker: 15,5 cm
4th CO: 17,5 cm
1st CO: 35,5 cm
marker: 15,5 cm
4th CO: 19,5 cm
1st CO: 34,5 cm
marker: 15,5 cm
4th CO: 22.5 cm
A = 12 cm1st CO: 40 cm
marker: 17 cm
4th CO: 19 cm
1st CO: 39 cm
marker: 17 cm
4th CO: 21 cm
1st CO: 38 cm
marker: 17 cm
4th CO: 24 cm
A = 13 cm1st CO: 43,5 cm
marker: 18,5 cm
4th CO: 20,5 cm
1st CO: 42,5 cm
marker: 18,5 cm
4th CO: 22,5 cm
1st CO: 41 cm
marker: 18,5 cm
4th CO: 25,5 cm

Of course, you have to calculate the number of stitches from the centimetres according to your swatch.


From edge of V-neck to just under the arm

Just if you're interested - if you are not, please use a piece of paper or cardboard to measure as you knit (as indicated above) ...

It took me a while to figure this out - and I don't think it's quite elegant (as calculations go). If you know an easier way to calculate this, please let me know.

There are three numbers that you know
A = (the depth of the V)
D/2 = half of the top's width
E = shoulder to underarm

These are shown in the picture below - laid over a sketch of one shoulder of the top.

There is an rectangle with side lengths E and D/2. To calculate the centimetres from the edge of the V to below the arm (x), you need to enlarge this to an (imaginary) square with the side length D/2.
The diagonal of this square measures (that consists of x and another unknown y):

y can be calculated as follows:

So, x can be directly calculated:

Example calculation:
I had A = 11 cm, E = 21 cm and D/2 = 25 cm.

To calculate y (step by step)
A + D/2 - E = 11 + 25 - 21 = 15
15 * 15 =  225
225 /2 =  112
√112 = 10,6
=> y = 10,6

Now x+y:
D/2 * D/2 = 25 * 25 = 625
2 * 625 = 1250
√1250 = 35, 35
=> x + y  = 35, 35

x = 35,35 - 10,6 = 24,75 cm

With my gauge 24.75 cm equalled about 49 garter stitch ridges.

Front view - the skirt is an upcycling project made from old jeans