Sonntag, 22. Februar 2015

New Construction Idea

Many of the mitts I designed over the last year or so, were constructed in a way that I didn't have to cut my yarn in the process. For me this is quite important, because
  1. I don't especially like weaving in ends :)
  2. I frog my stuff so often that it would be a waste to cut the yarn before I was sure that the knitted piece would stay in the shape it's currently in
However, when knitting with variegated yarn there are other considerations, too. I think it looks nicer when there is no "jump" in the color gradient, e.g. when you put the thumb stitches to a stitch holder and finish the mitt - and then when you attach the yarn to the thumb stitches the color just won't fit.
This is not exactly tragic, but when I got some new (variegated) sock yarn, I was determined to construct new mitts in a way that I wouldn't have to cut the yarn - which means either to start with the thumb or end with it.
I've already published a few patterns that match this description (e.g. Circle Mitts, Pieces of Eight Mitts, Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves), but it's more fun to construct something new. So, voilà, here's the new construction. A bit on the lines of the Zoom Out gloves, but with a different start.

Fingerless Gloves - Knitting Construction

 

So, all I need to do now is finish them, write up the pattern, get some nice photos and find a good name for them. Any name suggestions are welcome.


Samstag, 7. Februar 2015

Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves

Free Knitting Pattern: Zoom Out  Fingerless Gloves
Started from a poin t at the outer edge of the wrist, these fingerless gloves grow in a circle shape and finish at the thumb. One mitt is knitted in one part, i.e. you don’t need to cut your yarn. Because of the shaping this pattern is great to show off variegated yarn. Furthermore, it's a good way to try out new techniques.



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



WARNING: The pattern is written in a way that it can be adapted to different hand sizes. In consequence, the pattern doesn't give exact stitch counts. Iut also asks the knitter a few times to "knit until it roughly fits around [something]". If you're uncomfortable with directions like that, you probably won't like the pattern.

Since it also uses some advanced techniques, I guess the pattern is not suited for beginners.

Materials
  • about 30 grams of fingering weight yarn (the yarns I used are listed at the end of this post)
  • 3mm needles (I used long circulars and the magic ring method to start with, but ended with dpns for the thumbs)
  • a crochet hook

Techniques and Abbreviations
  • Magic Ring CO: Basically, the magic ring technique (from crochet) is used to cast on knitted stitches. There are several videos on Youtube that show the technique - I used something similar to the technique shown in the first video, but since this is fiddly work, just use the one that suits you best.
  • Short rows with double stitches (German short rows, t+p): when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of "double-stitch" is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, make sure to knit it as one stitch (see also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6n561SMZXQ); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).
  • Stretchy Bind-Off: for the bind offs at the end of parts 1 and 4, I used this technique: http://youtu.be/cGHItYwr1us – however, other reasonably stretchy COs will do as well.
  • Knitting a flat circle: Generally, a flat circle is knitted as follows:
    CO8 and join in round
    Round 1 (and all odd-numbered rounds): k
    Round 2: *kfb repeat from * (i.e. every stitch is doubled) (-> 16 sts)
    Round 4: * k1 kfb repeat from * (i.e. every 2rd stitch is doubled)(-> 24 sts)
    Round 6: * k2 kfb repeat from * (i.e. every 3rd stitch is doubled) (-> 32 sts)
    Round 8: * k3 kfb repeat from * (i.e. every 4th stitch is doubled) (-> 40 sts)
    … I'm sure, the formula is clear by now, namely that you increase by 8 stitches every other row. It also means that the distance between the "doubled" stitches increases by one in each of the increase-rounds. The same "formula" will be used when constructing the mitts. If you do the increases at the same spot (i.e. one kfb on top of the last one) a pattern (maybe even corners) will become visible; to achieve a more circular look I started the increases at a different location in each increase row. 
  • Three-Needle Bind-Off: http://youtu.be/wpJUrCX52DU  
  • Knitted Cast-On: http://youtu.be/-nJKC2xT0Q4


Gauge or What to measure beforehand?
The pattern is written in a way, that it can be adapted to your hand size. Therefore gauge doesn’t really matter.
However, you should measure the circumference of your wrists. as well as the circumference of your
knuckles.

Instructions
Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves - Construction
Picture 1: Project Parts
The general construction of these fingerless gloves and the parts is shown in picture 1 on the right.
  • Part 1: This part is knitted in the round and ends with a short bind-off at the lower edge.
  • Part 2: This part is knitted back and forth and ends with a three-needle bind-off. Parts 1 and 2 constitute the wrist portion of the mitts.
  • Part 3: This part is knitted back and forth around the thumb gusset and ends with a three-needle bind-off, as well; the upper edge is knitted as well as the portion that covers the palms and back of the hands.
  • Part 4: This part, the thumb, is knitted in the round.

Picture 2 (below) shows how the mitts look while being knitted.

Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves - Stages of knitting
Picture 2: How the mitts look in the different stages of knitting

Part 1:
CO 8 stitches with the magic ring cast-on methods (see Picture 2 - No. 1)
Round 1 and all odd-numbered rounds: k
Round 2: * kfb repeat from * to end of round (now your knitting should look like No. 2 in Picture 2)
Round 4: * kfb k repeat from * to end of round
Round 6: * k kfb k repeat from * to end of round
Round 8: * k3 kfb k5 repeat from * to end of round
Round 10: * k2 kfb k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 12: * k1 kfb k4 repeat from * to end of round
Round 14: * k4 kfb k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 16: * k6 kfb k1 repeat from * to end of round
Round 18: * k3 kfb k4 repeat from * to end of round
Round 20: * k7 kfb k2 repeat from * to end of round  (now your knitting should look like No. 3 in Picture 2)
Round 22: * k2 kfb k8 repeat from * to end of round

Continue in this fashinon until the diameter is about two thirds of the circumference of your wrist (doing 8 increases every other row, starting with a random offset) - and make sure that your last round is an odd-numbered round (i.e. a round without increases).
In the example above, this was the case after round 23. Please also remember the stitch distance between the increases in the last increase round in part I. (In the example above, there are 10 sts between the kfb's.)

Free Knitting Pattern: Zoom Out  Fingerless Gloves

Part 2:
Row 1: BO7 (with a stretchy bind-off), *k2 kfb k9 repeat from * until there are less than 11 sts left, k to the last sts of the round.
Then connect the last stitch to the first bind-off stitch as follows: Before turning slip the last stitch to the right needle and - using a crochet hook - draw the working yarn through the first BO stitch, put the loop on the left needle, move the last (not yet knitted) stitch back to the left needle, knit the two stitches together. This avoids the little gap between the first bind-off stitch and the last stitch of the row.
Row 2: p2tog, p10 t+p, k to end, turn,
     p2tog, p to last 2 sts, p2togtbl (Careful: when you reach the double stitch created with "t+p", make sure to knit it as one stitch)
Row 3: ssk k10 t+p, p to end, turn
     ssk, * k3 kfb k9 repeat from * until there are less than 12 sts on your needles, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Row 4 = Row 2
Row 5: ssk k10 t+p, p to end, turn
     ssk, * k10 kfb k3 repeat from * until there are less than 13 sts on your needles, k to last 2 sts, k2tog (now your knitting should look similar to No. 4 in Picture 2)
Row 6 = Row 2
Row 7: ssk k10 t+p, p to end, turn
     ssk, * k4 kfb k10 repeat from * until there are less than 14 sts on your needles, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Row 8 = Row 2
Row 9: ssk k10 t+p, p to end, turn
     ssk, * k6 kfb k9 repeat from * until there are less than 15 sts on your needles, k to last 2 sts, k2tog

Continue in this way until the lower edge is wide enough to fit around your wrists, i.e. equals your wrist circumference - for me this was the case after row 9. End with an odd-numbered row, i.e. a knit-row.

Count your stitches and place a marker right in the middle (Marker "Up") or (if your knitting with circulars and use the magic loop method) distribute the stitches in a way that one half of the stitches is on the front portion of the needle and the other half on the back.

To determine how many stitches you should take the stitch distance between the increases of your last row (for me this was 15) and add a third of this distance - if necessary, bring it down to a round figure. (So, for me this was 15 + 15/3 = 15 + 5 = 20.)

Free Knitting Pattern: Zoom Out  Fingerless Gloves

Part 3:
Do a three-needle bind-off with the RS together of the number of stitches you calculated (in my case BO20). Place the last stitch on the back needle.
Turn the mitt back inside out, i.e. the RS is visible now.
The first 2 rows are knitted around the stitch that was left over from the three-needle BO.

Row 1: place a marker (Marker "Down"), sl1 (that's the stitch that was left from the three-needle BO), slip Marker "Down", pick up 1 or 2 stitches from the gap to the next stitch (to avoid a hole), k3, t+p, p2 or p3 (depending on the number of stitches you've just picked up from the gap), p2tog, p1, pick up 1 or 2 stitches from the gap, p3, t+p, k1, k2tog, k to Marker "Down"
Row 2: k7, t+p, p3, p2tog, p1, slip Marker "Down", p6, t+p, k3, k2tog (you're back at Marker "Down")
Row 3: k to Marker "Up", cast on 10 stitches with a knitted cast-on, turn,
     k9, k2tog, p2, t+p, k to end
Row 4: sl1, k8, k2tog, p to 3 sts before Marker "Down", p2tog, p1, p2togtbl, p to Marker "Up" (remove this marker), pick up 1 stitch from the gap, then pick up and knit 10 stitches form the lower edge of the knitted cast-on.
Row 5: k9, k2tog, k3, t+p, p2, k to end, turn,
     k9, k2tog, k2, k2tog, k to Marker "Down", k to end (now your knitting should look similar to No. 5 in Picture 2)
Row 6: sl1, k8, k2tog, p2, t+p, k to end, turn
     sl1, k8, k2tog, p to the last 10 sts, k10
Row 7: sl1, k8, k2tog, k2, t+p, p1, k to end, turn
     sl1, k8, k2tog, k to end
Row 8: sl1, k8, k2tog, p2, t+p, k to end, turn
     sl1, k8, k2tog, k to 8 sts before Marker "Down", k2tog, k12, ssk, k to end

Repeat rows 7 and 6 until the upper edge measures rougly a centimeter less than the circumference of your knuckles.
If you feel that the part is getting to wide, you can always do symmeticral decreases (like row 8). In the end, you should have roughly 36 2x18 (i.e. 18 sts on each side of Marker "up") sts on your needles. Make sure to end with an even-number row (i.e. a WS row).

Now you will knit a few rows of garter stitch to complete the upper border and to provide an upper edge to the thumb gusset.
Row 1: sl, k9, turn (don't wrap! don't t+p! don't connect in any way to the rest of your knitting.)
Row 2: sl, k9
Repeat rows 1 and 2 four more times.

(If you try the mitts on now, your knitting should look similar to No. 6 in Picture 2).

Do a three-needle bind-off of the top 10 stitches - making sure that the seam is on the inside of the mitt.



Part 4:
I'd advise to distribute the thumb stitches on three dpns, one needle for the stitches picked up above the thumb, and two for the stitches that were "left over" in part 3.

Round 1: Place the last stitch on the back needle (or a new dpn). With that needle pick up 5 sts from the lower edge of the lower edge of the garter stitch border on top of the thumb, pick up 1 or 2 stitches from the gap (if you don't use three dpns, place marker 1), k to end (if you don't use dpns, place marker2) and pick up 1 or 2 stitches from the gap.

You should now have between 26 and 28 sts on your needles (i.e. 1 (leftover from 3NBO) + 5 (picked up from edge) + 1 (from gap) + 16  + 1 (from gap) = 26).

Round 2: k to 1 st before end of needle (or 1 st before marker 1), ssk, replace marker 1, k to 1 st before end of 3rd needle (or 1 st before marker 2), replace marker 2, k2tog,
Repeat round 2, until there are 18 sts left on your needles, always decreasing over the gap between the top on the thumb and the sides.

Knit one more round.

Ribbing: Knit 6 rounds of k1 p1-ribbing
Bind off in pattern.


Yarns


Sonntag, 25. Januar 2015

How to Use Yarn Leftovers

A while ago I had the idea to construct fingerless gloves from leftovers. I got a selection of fingering weight yarns in reddish colours - plus some grey and white to show off the red.


These mitts are constructed from stripes that are joined in the round contrasted with parts that are knitted in the round. I like the idea of knitting in different directions :)
I guess there will be five or four parts to make up one mitt, i.e. currently they aren't even half done ... but the idea is worth pursuing ... and I will probably write a tutorial.

Freitag, 23. Januar 2015

Links from Italy

Spam folders can be cruel. I only just found out that some of my patterns were being linked from a yarn store site in Italy. They had sent me an e-mail, that was stuck in my spam folder for a few days.


They have linked to two of my designs - Circle Mitts (or Guanti ai ferri Circle) and Helix Mitts (or Guanti ai ferri Helix) - and I do like the way they write about my designs ... very flattering :)

Sonntag, 11. Januar 2015

Queen of Diamonds Scarf

Queen of Diamonds - free scarf knitting patternThis scarf is an example of modular knitting. It's made out of diamond-shaped modules form a longish rhomboid. To add a little spice there is a hole in the middle of each diamond.

As with most examples of modular knitting, it's a great way to show off variegated yarn.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • 140 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 3.25mm needles
  • 11 sts markers
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Abbreviations and Special Stitches
  • open6 = k1 slip sts back to left hand needle and pass the next 6 sts over it, yo twice, k1
  • close6 = slip one yo off the needle, into the remaining yo do: k1 yo k1 yo k1 k1tbl
  • Short rows with double stitches (German short rows, t+p): when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of "double-stitch" is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6n561SMZXQ); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).
  • Knitted Cast-On: http://youtu.be/IzVy8fRfOw0
  • Stretchy Bind-Off: http://youtu.be/cGHItYwr1us

Construction

The scarf is knitted in diamond-shaped modules. Picture 1 shows the construction of the scarf and how the diamonds add up to form a parallelogram - the yellow arrows indicate the order in which the diamonds are knitted. (Click on the picture to enlarge it.)

Picture 1: Construction of Queen of Diamonds Scarf

All diamonds marked with "n" (normal diamonds) are knitted as follows:
R1: k25 t+p
R2: k23 t+p
R3: k21 t+p
R4: k19 t+p
R5: k17 t+p
R6: k15 t+p
R7: k13 t+p
R8: k11 t+p
R9: k1 open6 k1
R10: k1 close6 k3
R11: k11 t+p
R12: k13 t+p
R13: k15 t+p
R14: k17 t+p
R15: k19 t+p
R16: k21 t+p
R17: k23 t+p -> don't turn, but start next diamond

Picture 2 shows a diagram of how one diamond is knitted. The pattern is written in a way that stitch markers are not necessary, but I found it helpful to use them anyway to see easily where the boundaries and the middle of the current diamond are.
Please note that in row 9 - when starting the hole - the stitch marker has to be removed and in row 10 - when the hole is closed - it has to be placed again.

Picture 2: How to knit one Diamond

Depending on where you are in the knitting process, the directions for the first and last rows might be slightly different, i.e. they are variations of the diamonds marked with "n". These diamonds are marked with numbers.


Instructions

The numbers in brackets refer to the numbers in circles in picture 1.

Layer 1
Diamond (1):
CO 24 with a knitted cast-on
Row 1: k24
Row 2: sl k22 t+p
knit rows 3-17 of normal (n)-diamond

Layer 2
Diamond (2):
CO12 with knitted cast-on,
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 17 of normal (n)-diamond

Diamond (3):
k12, CO12 with knitted cast-on
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 17 of normal (n)-diamond

Layer 3
Diamond (4):
don't turn, k12 (i.e. to end)
CO12 with knitted cast-on
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 17 of normal (n)-diamond

Knit one (n)-diamond

Diamond (5):
don't turn, k12 (i.e. to end)
CO12 with knitted cast-on
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 16 of normal (n)-diamond

Layer 4
Knit a diamond (2)
Knit two (n)-diamonds
Knit a diamond (3)

Layer 5
Knit a diamond (4)
Knit three (n)-diamonds
Knit a diamond (5)

Layer 6
Queen of Diamonds - free scarf knitting pattern
Knit a diamond (2)
Knit four (n)-diamonds

Diamond (6):
don't turn, k12 (i.e. to end)
CO12 with knitted cast-on
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 16 of normal (n)-diamond
Row 17: BO12

Layer 7
Diamond (7):
Row 1: k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 16 of normal (n)-diamond
Row 17: BO12, k12

Knit four (n)-diamonds
Knit a diamond (5)

Layer 8
Knit a diamond (2)
Knit four (n)-diamonds
Knit a diamond (8)

Repeat Layers 7 and 8 until your scarf feels long enough - except for the end.

Layer 9
Queen of Diamonds - free scarf knitting patternKnit a diamond (7)
Knit four (n)-diamonds

Diamond (9):
don't turn, k12 (i.e. to end)
CO12 with knitted cast-on
Row 1: k12 pm k13 t+p
Knit rows 2 to 16 of normal (n)-diamond
Row 17: BO12

Layer 10
Diamond (10):
Knit rows 1-16 of normal (n)-diamond
Row 17: BO12, k12

Knit three (n)-diamonds
Knit a diamond (8)

Layer 11
Knit a diamond (7)
Knit two (n)-diamonds



Diamond (11)
Knit rows 1 to 16 of normal (n)-diamond
Row 17: BO12

Layer 12
Knit a diamond (10)
Knit one (n)-diamond
Knit a diamond (8)

Layer 13
Knit a diamond (7)
Knit a diamond (11)

Layer 14
Diamond (12)
Knit rows 1-16 of normal (n)-diamond
BO all stitches

Weave in ends and block.

Sonntag, 28. Dezember 2014

Focussed ...

Over christmas I usually have a lot of spare time to try out some new stuff. This year I thought it'd be interesting to knit a pair of mitts starting from one focussing point around the edge of the hand ... a bit like Circle Mitts - just starting at the opposite side.

Here's the first one I came up with. However, I didn't like the finishing, i.e. the upper edge and the shape of the thumb.


That's why I started anew - this time with a better idea on how to knit the upper edge and the thumb. I also tried to make them a bit asymmetrical, i.e. placing the starting point a bit more on the back of the hand.


I like this version better, but I guess I'll need to knit another pair (in a nice yarn) to be able to write up a pattern and to get decent pictures.

Donnerstag, 11. Dezember 2014

Double Helix Mitts

After finishing the Helix Mitts, I played bit further with the idea ... and came up with mitts formed of two strips winding up the hands ...

When knitting these, you take turns in knitting with color A and with color B - that's why you need three needles to knit them. As with the Helix Mitts, the strips are joined as you knit, so no sewing is required.

For most female hands, you need less than 15 grams of fingering weight yarn for each color (i.e. a total of 30 grams) – therefore it’s a great pattern to use up leftovers of nice sock yarn. I used some leftover Lang Sansibar contrasted with some beige Alpaca yarn.

Materials
  • a total of about 30 grams of sport weight yarn (5-ply) in two colors
  • three knitting needles (3mm) - I used short dpns
  • about 14 removable stitch markers or safety pins


Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Abbreviations and Special Techniques
  • Joining to rows at the edges: There are various ways to connect the last stitch of one ridge to the first stitch of another. I used the following ones:
    For the first mitt, I'd knit to the last stitch of the RS row slip it knitwise, pick up the front leg of the edge stitch, then insert the left hand needle as for a slip-slip knit and knit the two loops together. On the back row I'd slip the first stitch and knit to the end.
    Since the mitts are mirror inverted, they coil in the opposite direction. This meant that I had to do the join from the WS, like that. I'd knit to the last stitch and slip it as if to purl through the back loop (ptbl) with yarn in front, turn your work; pick up a leg of the edge stitch you want to join to and do a k2tog of this and the stitch you just turned.
    However, there are other methods to join rows at the edges, one method is shown here: http://youtu.be/3zPXZ4cu66Q . Please note that whatever you do, please stay consistent throughout one mitt.
  • German short rows: when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of double-stitch is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also http://youtu.be/PsBkXPmjgaE); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).

"Gauge" – or what you should check beforehand
Measure the circumference of your wrists – loosely. If 36 rows (i.e. 18 garter stitch ridges) measure more than half of this circumference – the mitts will be too wide for you.
If – as me – you don’t like to knit a swatch, you can alternatively knit the first piece (i.e. the beginning of Round 1 – Color A) to check if it fits.


Instructions

The instructions are given in rounds or levels, i.e. layers of garter strip stitches – one layer per color. Ends of levels, i.e. the last rows of each round, are marked with stitch markers or safety pins.

First Mitt

Level 1 – Color A:
CO2
R0: k2
R1: k1 mk1 k1
R2 – R6: sl1, k1
R7: sl1, kfb, k to end
R8 – R12: sl, k to end
Repeat R7 to R12 four more times, you should have 8 stitches on your needle. The piece should look like a triangle.

If the piece is shorter than half of the
circumference of your wrists, go on with R11 and R12 until you have reached the desired length (i.e. half the circumference of your wrist).
Mark the last row (this marker will be called: Level-1-A-Marker - see picture on the right to see how the markers are placed)

Level 1 – Color B:
With yarn B and a new needle (and as yet complete unattached to the piece you just knitted)
Knit the same piece in color B.
Mark the last row (this marker will be called: Level-1-B-Marker)

Level 2 – Color A:
Now the last stitch of a color A row is connected to the first stich of a color B row.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch knitwise, pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle into both stitches and knit like an ssk.
Standard Row 2 (SR2): sl1, k to end
Repeat these standard rows at least 5 times.

Level 2 – Color B:
Fold the connected strip backwards (see illustration no. 1) so that you can connect the next row of the color B-triangle to the first row of the color A-triangle.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch knitwise, pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle into both stitches and knit like an ssk.
Standard Row 2 (SR2): sl1, k to end
Repeat these standard rows at least 5 times.
Illustrations 1, 2, 3 and 4

Now finish round 2 in colors A and B – taking turns to knit. (You don't have to finish a layer of one color before switching to the other one. You can switch anytime inbetween as long as you use the markers.)
When you connect a row to a row with a marker, mark this row (the markers will be called Level-2-A-Marker and Level-2-B-Marker respectively)

Level 3 – Color A
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-2-B-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-3-A-Marker)

Level 3 – Color B
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-2-A-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-3-B-Marker)

Level 4 – Color A
The following short row sequence serves to wide the mitts and to create a thumb gusset. (One garter stitch ridge equals two rows).
Ridge 1 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 2: sl1, k6, t+p, k to end
Ridge 3 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 4 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 5: sl1, k5, t+p, k to end
Ridge 6 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 7 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 8: sl1, k6, t+p, k to end
Ridge 9 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 10 = SR1, SR2
Place a marker (this will be called Thumb-End-Marker-A)
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-3-B-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-4-A-Marker)

Level 4 – Color B
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-3-A-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-4-B-Marker)

Level 5 – Color A
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-4-B-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-5-A-Marker)

Level 5 – Color B
Now the thumb gusset will be widened a bit more with some short rows.
Ridge 1 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 2 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 3: sl1, k6, t+p, k to end
Ridge 4 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 5 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 6: sl1, k5, t+p, k to end
Ridge 7 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 8 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 9: sl1, k5, t+p, k to end
Ridge 10 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 11 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 12: sl1, k6, t+p, k to end
Ridge 13 = SR1, SR2
Ridge 14 = SR1, SR2
Place a marker (this will be called Thumb-End-Marker-B) - illustration no. 3 shows how the piece should look now.
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-4-A-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-5-B-Marker)

Level 6 – Color A
R1: sl1, k to end (do NOT attach the last stitch to the level below)
R2: sl1, k to end
Repeat R1 and R2 five more times.
Try it on and see if the unattached strip fits over your thumb to reach Thumb-End-Marker-B (see illustration no. 4). If it’s too short repeat R1 and R2 once more.
Knit SR1, but attach the last stitch to the first stitch of the row marked with Thumb-End-Marker-B.
Knit SR2.
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-5-B-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-6-A-Marker)

Level 6 – Color B
Continue knitting SR1 and SR2 – when you reach the row marked with Level-5-A-Marker, place a marker (this will be called Level-6-B-Marker)

Level 7 – Colors A and B
R1 = SR1
R2 = SR2
R3 = SR1
R4: sl1, k2tog, k to end
R5 = SR1
R6 = SR2
Repeat R1 to R6 until there are 3 sts left.

R7 = SR1
R8 = SR2
R9 = SR1
R10: sl1, k2tog, k to end
R11: SR1
R12: ssk, cut yarn and draw through loop


2nd Mitt

There are two differences that make the mitts mirror-images of one another:
a) the knitted strip is folded differently when first connecting the rows
b) the connection is done differently (i.e. standard rows 1 and 2 are different, as described below).

Knit level 1 (colors A and B) as for 1st mitt.

Level 2 - Color A
Now the last stitch of a color A row is connected to the first stich of a color B row.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch wyif as if to do a ptbl
Standard Row 2 (SR2): pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), k to end
Repeat these standard rows at least 5 times.

Level 2 – Color B
Fold the connected strip forwards (i.e. in the opposite direction as for the first mitt, see illustration no. 2) so that you can connect the next row of the color B-triangle to the first row of the color A-triangle.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch knitwise, pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle into both stitches and knit like an ssk.
Standard Row 2 (SR2): sl1, k to end
Repeat these standard rows at least 5 times.

Now finish round 2 in colors A and B – taking turns to knit.
When you connect a row to a row with a marker, mark this row (the markers will be called Level-2-A-Marker and Level-2-B-Marker respectively)

Knit levels 3 to 6 (in both colors) as for 1st mitt.

Level 7 – Colors A and B
R1 = SR1
R2 = SR2
R3 = SR1
R4: pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), k2tog, k to end
R5 = SR1
R6 = SR2
Repeat R1 to R6 until there are 3 sts left.

R7 = SR1
R8 = SR2
R9 = SR1
R10: pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), k2tog, k to end
R11: sl1, sl1 as if to ptbl
R12: pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), cut yarn and draw through loop

Before you weave in the ends, turn the mitts inside out and decide which side you like best. The picture on the right shows the difference - one knit has been turned inside out and you can see that the connection looks different. After you have decided, weave in ends.