Sonntag, 5. Oktober 2014

Circle Mitts - Aran Weight Version

A while ago I knitted the Swiss Cheese Scarf by Winnie Shih from really old yarn that I had bought some time in the 80ies. At that time it had been knitted into a sweater and been frogged several years later. Photos of this scarf project are on its Ravelry page.

I decided to knit a new pair of Circle Mitts (original pattern on my blog) but with the heavier yarn. I had one hank left with a label - from that I infered that the yarn was Aran weight.

This is a short version - for the general construction etc., please refer to the original Circle Mitts pattern.



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Materials
  • 4.5mm needles (I switched from dpns to circulars and back - even if you use circulars, you will need a third needle for the three-needle BO)
  • about 50 grams of aran weight yarn
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Abbreviations
  • kfb: knit front & back
  • mk1: make 1 knit stitch
  • ssk: slip slip knit
  • k2tog: knit 2 sts together
  • p2tog: purl 2 sts together
  • mk1p: make 1 purl stitch
  • p2tog: purl 2 sts together through the back loop
  • wrap and turn: a method for short rows

Instructions

Part 1 - Thumb

CO12 and join in round (I used this strechy cast-on method, but other CO methods are fine as well)
Knit 5 rounds of k1 p1-ribbing
Knit 3 rounds of plain stockinette stitch
Row 9: *k2 kfb repeat from * (you have increased by 4 sts => 16 sts on your needles)
Knit 2 more rounds of plain stockinette stitch

Part 2
(basically, you'll increase by 8 sts every other row)
Row 1: *k2 mk1 repeat from * (+8 => 24 sts)
Row 2 (and every other even row during part 2): k
Row 3:  *k1 mk1 k2 repeat from *
Row 5: *mk1 k4 repeat from *
Row 7: *k3 mk1 k2 repeat from *
Row 9: *k5 mk1 k1 repeat from *
BO 5 and continue knitting the round to end

Part 3
Turn work
Row 1: p2tog, * p3 mk1p p4 repeat from * until there are less than 7 sts left, p to last 2 sts, p2togtbl
Row 2: ssk, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Row 3: p2tog, * p5 mk1p p3 repeat from * until there are less than 8 sts left, p to last 2 sts, p2togtbl
Rows 4 & 5: ssk, k6, wrap and turn, p to last 2 sts , p2togtbl
Row 6: ssk, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Rows 7 & 8: p2tog, p6, wrap and turn, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Row 9: p2tog, *p6, mk1p, p3 repeat from * until there are less than 9 sts left, p to last 2 sts, p2togtbl
Row 10: ssk, k to last 2 sts, k2tog
Row 11: p2tog, *p3, mk1p, p7 repeat from * until there are less than 10 sts left, p to last 2 sts, p2togtbl
Row 12: ssk, k to last 2 sts, k2tog

You should now have something like 54 sts on your needles. Hold the sides together and with a three-needle bind-off, BO 15 sts.

If you  want the upper edge to be wider, just insert a few more of the short row sequences (Rows 4 & 5, and 7 & 8). For a more detailed explanations (as well as how to calculate the number of stitches to bind off if the mitts are wider), please read the original pattern.

Part 4
Distribute the remaining 24 stitches on your needles and put the stitch that remained from BO on the first needle. The remaining sts will be knitted in the round.

Round 1: sl1, pick up 2 sts from the gap between the first st and the next one (this will avoid holes), k10, mk1, k4, mk1, k to end, pick up 2 sts from gap between the stitch you just knitted and the first in the round (=> now there are 6 sts more on your needles, i.e. 30)
Row 2: (RS) k12, wrap and turn,
    (WS): p12, p12, wrap and turn (or use another method for short rows, e.g. this)
    (RS): k12
Row 3: (RS) k9, wrap and turn
     (WS): p7 p2tog, p2tog, p7, wrap and turn
     (RS); k9
Row 34 (RS) k5, wrap and turn
     (WS): p5, p5, wrap and turn
     (RS); k5
Round 25: k one round (picking up all wrapped sts).

Part 5
Knit 3 more rounds
Knit 6 rounds of k1 p1-ribbing
Bind-off loosely in pattern

Weave in ends.
Make two.

Samstag, 4. Oktober 2014

How to Use This Yarn?

In June I bought a skein of variegated yarn - with colours ranging from white over yellow, orange and red to light- and dark-blue. Here's a selection of my failed attempts, i.e. ideas that I didn't really like - another one is in this blog post :/


Yesterday, I decided that I would try something modular - that way yarn of one colour would be close :) For the modules, I basically used the same almond shape as in the Almendra scarf. But I added a little hole (4 stitches wide) in the center of each "almond". So far, it's the best I've tried with this yarn ... now I only have to decide whether it will be a triangular shawl or a rhomboid wrap ... hmm, difficult ...

Montag, 15. September 2014

Almendra Cowl

This cowl is made up of almond shaped short row sequences - with full rows in a contrast colour inbetween.

I like my cowls to fit around my neck twice. Threrefore this cowl is double-length, with a circumference of 140 cm - after blocking. It measures between 20 and 25 cm in height.


Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.





Materials
  • 150 grams of worsted weight yarn in Main Colour (MC)
  • 50 grams of worsted weight yarn in Contrast Colour (CC, beige on the photos)
  • 5.5mm circular knitting needles
  • 11 stitch markers (one different from the others)
  • tapestry needle to weave in ends

I used some Noro Kurayon (Colourway 40 as MC and Colourway 211E as CC) that I've had in my stash for quite a while.

General Construction
Knitted in the round, this cowl consist of almond shaped short row sequences that are knitted one after another. When one layer is finished,  two full rows are knitted in a contrast colour. The next layer starts with an offset of 10 stitches.



Techniques
  • Short rows with double stitches (German short rows, t+p): when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of "double-stitch" is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6n561SMZXQ); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).
  • Cheats to avoid cutting yarn: Since I try out a lot (and consequently frog a lot), I avoid cutting yarn at all costs. That's why I'd rather strand yarn over a few stitches (or more) or slip a few stitches. In case of this pattern, this is necessary to get either MC or CC yarn to the start of the new row.
    The picture below shows how this stranding looks from the WS. The encircled numbers show where a new layer starts ("1" = start of first layer, "2" = start of second layer etc.)


Instructions
With CC CO 200 putting a stitch marker after every 20th stitch
Place last stitch marker and join in round (careful not to twist the stitches)
Purl one round, place a different marker to mark the end or round (this marker ("end marker") will be moved).

First Layer (Odd-numbered Layers)
Attach MC and with MC knit the first almond-section as follows
R1 (RS): k20 (i.e. to next marker, left border marker), t+p (turn and pull, see Techniques section)
R2 (WS): k20 (i.e. back to last marker and one stitch further), t+p
R3 (RS): k18, t+p
R4 (WS): k16, t+p
R5 (RS): k14, t+p
R6 (WS): k12, t+p
R7 (RS): k10, t+p
R8 (WS): k8, t+p
R9 (RS): k6, t+p
R10 (WS): k4, t+p
R11 (RS): k5, t+p
R12 (WS): k6, t+p
R13 (RS): k8, t+p
R14 (WS): k10, t+p
R15 (RS): k12, t+p
R16 (WS): k14, t+p
R17 (RS): k16, t+p
R18 (WS): k18, t+p
R19 (RS): k19 (i.e. to left border marker), and DON'T TURN
Continue from Row 1 and knit the next almond-section.

The picture below gives a sketch of the rows in relation to the stitch markers in odd numbered layers.



When you have finished the "almond section" that reaches the end marker or after you have knitted 10 "almonds" switch to CC.

With CC knit one round (stranding MC over the first 10 stitches) - please be careful to knit the double-stitches as one stitch (here the double stitches are the one just before and just after the stitch marker)
Purl one round. Remove the end marker, slip ten stitches, place the end marker.
(If - unlike me - you haven't got a problem with cutting yarn, you can alternatively break MC, knit one round in CC, purl one round in CC, cut CC, remove end marker, slip ten stitches, place end marker and then attach MC to start again.)

Second Layer (Even-Numbered Layers)
With MC start knitting the next almond - however, it is not knitted in the 20 sts between two stitch markers, but around one stitch marker (10 stitches on the left hand side and 10 stitches on the right hand side of the stitch marker).

R1 (RS): k20 (i.e. to next marker, left border marker), t+p (turn and pull, see Techniques section)
R2 (WS): k20 (i.e. back to last marker and one stitch further), t+p
R3 (RS): k18, t+p
R4 (WS): k16, t+p
R5 (RS): k14, t+p
R6 (WS): k12, t+p
R7 (RS): k10, t+p
R8 (WS): k8, t+p
R9 (RS): k6, t+p
R10 (WS): k4, t+p
R11 (RS): k5, t+p
R12 (WS): k6, t+p
R13 (RS): k8, t+p
R14 (WS): k10, t+p
R15 (RS): k12, t+p
R16 (WS): k14, t+p
R17 (RS): k16, t+p
R18 (WS): k18, t+p
R19 (RS): k19 (i.e. to left border marker), and DON'T TURN
Continue from Row 1 and knit the next almond-section.

When you have finished the "almond section" that reaches the end marker or after you have knitted 10 "almonds" switch to CC.

With CC knit one round (stranding MC over the first 10 stitches) - please be careful to knit the double-stitches as one stitch (here the double stitches are the one just before and just after the stitch marker)
Purl one round. Remove the end marker, slip ten stitches, place the end marker.
(If - unlike me - you haven't got a problem with cutting yarn, you can alternatively break MC, knit one round in CC, purl one round in CC, cut CC, remove the end marker, slip ten stitches , place the end marker, and then attach MC to start again.)

The picture below gives a sketch of the rows in relation to the stitch markers in even numbered layers.


Repeat first and second layer until the cowl is wide enough for you. I knitted a total of 5 layers (3x odd-numbered layers and 2x even-numbered layers).

Finish with one knit row in CC and bind off purling in CC.

Montag, 1. September 2014

Playing around with Short-Rows ... and Frogging them

I suppose I'm the queen of frogging ... for every piece I knit, I probably try out three to five different designs until I like it. It's a good thing then, that I usually buy yarn, that can be treated that way (like Noro Kurayon, that doesn't look worse for being ribbed back a few times).

But I guess, I've got it right this time - and I hope I will write up the pattern eventually :)

Freitag, 29. August 2014

Knitted Food

In one of the advertising "newspapers" (you know, the ones you get, if you have a store-card for the supermarket etc.) there was an article about a lady who creates knitted food installations. The article is available online (in german).


That made me google for her - and I found her website and her blog. I do love some of the photos there - there is even a free (german) pattern for a knitted sausage :)

I apologize that all the links are to german-speaking webpages, but really like the idea - and I like her knitting philosophy as expressed in the article: "[Stricken ...] helfe, ein Trauma zu verarbeiten, und tue auch Depressiven gut. Am besten sei Stricken ohne eigentlichen Zweck, .... Wenn man wie sie ohne Muster oder Vorlage arbeitet und sich das Objekt einfach vorstellt, fokussiert sich der Geist aufs innere Bild und lässt schlechte Gedanken vorbeiziehen."
Roughly translated: "Knitting helps to coping with trauma and is even good for depressive people. The best is knitting without a purpose ... When one works like her without patterns and just imagines the object, the mind focuses on an inner picture and lets bad thoughts disappear."

Sonntag, 24. August 2014

"Through Thick and Thin"-Schal

Dieser leichte Schal besteht nur aus rechten Maschen und wird von Spitze zu Spitze gestrickt. Die Form entsteht durch Dreiecke, die mit verkürzten Reihen gebildet werden. Der Unterschied in der Struktur kommt durch die Verwendung von verschieden dicken Nadeln (3mm und 6mm). Daher auch der Name ("Through Thick and Thin" = durch dick und dünn).

The English version of this pattern can be found here.
Eine englische Version dieser Anleitung findet sich hier.

Nach dem Spannen ist der Schal ca. 170 cm lang und an der breitesten Stelle ca. 24 cm breit.



Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag
Dieses Werk von Knitting and so on ist lizenziert unter einer Creative Commons Namensnennung - Nicht-kommerziell - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 4.0 International Lizenz.

Materialien
ca. 80g 4-fädiges Garn
3mm Stricknadeln
6mm Stricknadeln
Nähnadel, um die Fadenenden zu vernähen

Techniken und Notation

  • Ausser rechten Maschen musst du für diesen Schal fast nur verkürzte Reihen mit Doppelmasche stricken können. Dies funktioniert so: Man strickt bis zu der in der Anleitung angegebenen Masche und dreht die Arbeit. Das Garn liegt jetzt vor der Arbeit. Mit der rechten Nadel wird in die letzte Masche wie zum linksstricken eingestoche und das Garn wird dabei vollständig nach hinten gezogen, so dass es auf der Nadel wie doppelt aussieht (daher "Doppelmasche"). Eine sehr gute Erläuterung dieser Technik mit Fotos gibt es hier: http://alpistrickbuch.blogspot.ch/2009/09/verkurzte-reihen.html. Diese beiden Videos zeigen verkürzte Reihen mit Doppelmasche: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-cVsSgT-E4 und http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDN4zGqjBf0
    In der Anleitung wird dafür jeweils die Abkürzung d+z (drehen und ziehen) verwendet. Die dabei entstehende Doppelmasche wird in der Folgereihe nicht gezählt.
  • Hier noch die anderen Abkürzungen, die in der Anleitung verwendet werden.
    HR: Hinreihe
    RR: Rückreihe
    kfb: aus einer Masche zwei herausstricken, indem man zuerst eine Masche aus dem vorderen, dann eine aus dem hinteren Maschenglied strickt (ein Video hierzu gibt es bei Drops Design)


Anleitung

Mit den 3mm Nadeln 12 Maschen anschlagen

Erstes Dreieck (3mm Nadeln)
Generell wird in den 3mm-Dreiecken jede verkürzte Reihe um 4 Maschen kürzer als die Vorreihe gestrickt.
Reihe 1 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 2 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (HR): re. M. bis 3 M. vor dem Ende der Reihe (d.h. Es sind noch 3 Maschen auf der linken Nadel) , d+z (=drehen und ziehen, siehe Abschnitt „Techniken und Notation“)
Reihe 4 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (HR): re. M. bis 4 M. vor der letzten Doppelmasche; d+z
Reihe 6 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 7 (HR): re. M. bis 4 M. vor der letzten Doppelmasche; d+z
Reihe 8 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 9 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 10 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 11 (HR): re. M.
Zu 6mm Nadeln wechseln, d.h. die nächste Reihe wird mit 6mm Nadeln abgestrickt.

6mm-Dreieck (6mm-Nadeln)
Reihe 1 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 2 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (RR): re. M. bis 2 vor Ende der Reihe, d+z
Reihe 4 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (RR): re. M. bis 3 vor der letzten Doppelmasche d+z
Reihe 6 (HR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 3 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden (HR Reihe).
Weitere 3 Reihen stricken - zu 3mm Nadeln wechseln

3mm-Dreieck (3mm Nadeln) - zunehmend
Reihe 1 (HR): (5 re. M, kfb) wiederholen bis nur noch 5 M. oder weniger übrig sind, bis zum Ende  re. M. stricken
Reihe 2 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (HR): re. M. bis 3 vor dem Ende der Reihe; d+z
Reihe 4 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (HR): re. M. bis 4 vor der letzten Doppelmasche; d+z
Reihe 6 (RR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 4 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden(RR Reihe)
Weitere 3 Reihen stricken - zu 6mm Nadeln wechseln

Das 6mm-Dreieck und das 3mm-Dreieck (zunehmend) insgesamt 11 mal wiederholen, d.h. es wurden insgesamt 12 3mm-Dreiecke und 11 6mm-Dreiecke gestrickt.
Ein weiteres 6mm-Dreieck stricken – und wieder zu 3mm-Nadeln wechseln.

3mm-Dreieck (3mm-Nadeln) - neutral
Reihe 1 (HR): (5 re. M, kfb) wiederholen bis nur noch 5 M. oder weniger übrig sind, bis zum Ende  re. M. stricken
Reihe 2 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (HR): re. M. bis 3 vor dem Ende der Reihe, d+z
Reihe 4 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (HR): re. M. bis 4 vor der letzten Doppelmasche d+z
Reihe 6 (RR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 4 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden(RR Reihe)
2 Reihen re. M. stricken
Letzte Reihe (HR): (5 re. M., 2 M. zs.stricken) wiederholen bis nur noch 5 M. oder weniger übrig sind, bis zum Ende  re. M. stricken
Zu 6mm-Nadeln wechseln

6mm-Dreieck (6mm Nadeln) (gleich dem 6mm-Dreieck im zunehmenden Teil)
Reihe 1 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 2 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (RR): re. M. bis 2 vor dem Ende der Reihe, d+z
Reihe 4 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (RR): re. M. bis 3 vor der letzten Doppelmasche, d+z
Reihe 6 (HR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 3 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden (HR Reihe).
3 Reihen rechte Maschen stricken – zu 3mm Nadeln wechseln.

3mm Dreieck (3mm Nadeln) - abnehmend
Reihe 1 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 2 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (HR): re. M. bis 3 vor dem Ende der Reihe, d+z
Reihe 4 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (HR): re. M. bis 4 vor der letzten Doppelmasche d+z
Reihe 6 (RR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 4 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden(RR Reihe)
Knit 2 Reihen,
Letzte Reihe: (5 re. M., 2 M. zs.stricken) wiederholen bis nur noch 5 M. oder weniger übrig sind, bis zum Ende  re. M. stricken
Zu 6mm-Nadeln wechseln

Die 6mm- und 3mm-Dreiecke (abnehmend) abwechseln so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 10 Maschen auf den Nadeln sind.
Ein weiteres 6mm-Dreieck stricken.

3mm Dreieck (3mm needles) - Letztes Dreieck
Reihe 1 (HR): re. M.
Reihe 2 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 3 (HR): re. M. bis 3 vor end d+z
Reihe 4 (RR): re. M.
Reihe 5 (HR): re. M. bis 4 vor der letzten Doppelmasche d+z
Reihe 6 (RR): re. M.
Reihen 5 and 6 so lange wiederholen bis nur noch 4 Maschen oder weniger auf dem Rückweg gestrickt werden(RR Reihe)
2 weitere Reihen re. M. stricken
letzte Reihe: locker abketten

Die Enden vernähen und den Schal spannen.



Wenn du die Anleitung oben befolgst, sollte die Maschenanzahl und die Anzahl der gestrickten Reihen im zunehmenden Teil grösser werden (erst sehr langsam, dann schneller), und im abnehmenden Teil umgekehrt kleiner werden. Die Tabelle unten listet die genauen Zahlen auf.


Freitag, 22. August 2014

Through Thick and Thin

This light-weight "garter-stitch only" scarf - knitted from side to side and shaped with short row triangles. The difference in texture is achieved by switching needle sizes between
triangles.

After blocking the finished scarf measures about 170 cm from side to side and 24 cm at its widest point.

Eine deutsche Version dieser Anleitung gibt es hier.
A German version of this pattern can be found here.


Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.





Materials
  • about 80 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 3mm knitting needles
  • 6mm knitting needles
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques

Aside from knit stitches, all you need to know is how to knit short rows. Currently, my favorite technique are "German short rows": when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of "double-stitch" is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6n561SMZXQ); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).


Instructions

With 3mm needles CO12

Set-up wedge (3mm needles):

Generally in 3mm-wedges, rows are shortened by 4 sts, i.e. each row is 4 sts shorter than the one before.
Row 1 (RS): k to end
Row 2 (WS): k to end
Row 3 (RS): k to 3 sts before end (i.e. there are still 3 stitches on your left-hand needle), t+p (=turn and pull, see Techniques section)
Row 4 (WS): k to end
Row 5 (RS): k to 4 sts before last double stitch; t+p
Row 6 (WS): k to end
Row 7 (RS): k to 4 sts before last double stitch; t+p
Row 8 (WS): k to end
Row 9 (RS): k to end
Row 10 (WS): k to end
Row 11 (RS): k to end
Switch to 6mm needles

6mm-Wedge (6mm needles)
Generally in 6mm-wedges, rows are shortened by 3 sts, i.e. each row is 3 sts shorter than the one before.
Row 1 (WS): k to end
Row 2 (RS): k to end
Row 3 (WS): k to 2 before end t+p
Row 4 (RS): k to end
Row 5 (WS): k to 3 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (RS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 3 sts or less on the row back (RS row)
Knit 3 rows - switch to 3mm needles

3mm-Wedge (3mm needles) - Increasing
During the increasing part, at the beginning of a 3mm wedge each 6th sts is doubled.
Row 1 (RS): * k5 kfb repeat from * until there are 5 sts or less left, k to end
Row 2 (WS): k to end
Row 3 (RS): k to 3 before end t+p
Row 4 (WS): k to end
Row 5 (RS): k to 4 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (WS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 4 sts or less on the row back (WS row)
Knit 3 rows - switch to 6mm needles

Repeat 6mm-wegde and 3mm-wegde (increasing) 11 times (i.e. you have 12 3mm-wedges and 11 6mm-wedges)

Knit another 6mm-wedge

3mm-Wedge (3mm-needles) - Neutral
Row 1 (RS): * k5 kfb repeat from * until there are 5 sts or less left, k to end
Row 2 (WS): k to end
Row 3 (RS): k to 3 before end t+p
Row 4 (WS): k to end
Row 5 (RS): k to 4 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (WS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 4 sts or less on the row back (WS row)
Knit 2 rows
Last row (RS): *k 5 ssk repeat from * until there are 5 sts or less left, k to end
Switch to 6mm needles


6mm-Wedge (6mm needles) (No change to the increasing part)
Row 1 (WS): k to end
Row 2 (RS): k to end
Row 3 (WS): k to 2 before end t+p
Row 4 (RS): k to end
Row 5 (WS): k to 3 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (RS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 3 sts or less on the row back (RS row)
Knit 3 rows - switch to 3mm needles

3mm Wedge (knitted with 3mm needles) - Decreasing
During the decreasing part, at the end of a 3mm wedge each 7 sts are reduced to 6.
Row 1 (RS): k
Row 2 (WS): k to end
Row 3 (RS): k to 3 before end t+p
Row 4 (WS): k to end
Row 5 (RS): k to 4 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (WS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 4 sts or less on the row back (WS row)
Knit 2 rows,
Last row: *k 5 ssk repeat from * until there are 5 sts or less left, k to end
Switch to 6mm needles

Repeat 6mm-wedge and 3mm-wedge (decreasing) until there are only 10 stitches on your needles.
Knit one more 6mm-wedge

3mm Wedge (knitted with 3mm needles) - Last Wedge
Row 1 (RS): k
Row 2 (WS): k to end
Row 3 (RS): k to 3 before end t+p
Row 4 (WS): k to end
Row 5 (RS): k to 4 before last double-stitch t+p
Row 6 (WS): k to end
Repeat rows 5 and 6 until there are 4 sts or less on the row back (WS row)
Knit 2 rows,
Last row: bind off loosely

Weave in ends and block.

If you follow the instructions above, your stitch count will increase up to the neutral wedge as well as the number of rows per wedge - afterwards both will decrease. The table on the right lists the number of stitches and ridges that should appear.